April 2022
Hiking Yavapai
by
Stan Bindell

West Clear Creek

Tantalizing, cascading, flowing water is the highlight of the West Clear Creek Trail and the West Clear Creek Wilderness.

West Clear Creek Trail near Camp Verde is an eleven-mile round-trip for those who can make it over the four creek crossings. Sometimes the water is too high to pass, and at other times you can just rock-hop across the stream.

The creek winds 40 miles from the Mogollon Rim through the West Clear Creek Wilderness, making it the largest drainage from the Rim. There are nine trails in the wilderness area, but West Clear Creek Trail is the most popular.

Surrounded by soaring cliffs, sycamores, cottonwoods, Arizona walnut, willow and ash trees, the creek entices hikers into occasional shade, although there are portions of this trail that are mostly open. Some of the canyon is 2,000 feet deep.

The water also brings out bear, deer, mountain lion, badger, javelinas and ringtail cats. Birders also like this area for its kingbirds, orioles, tanagers, warblers, wrens, yellow-billed cuckoos, eagles and red-tailed hawks. The hiker will also want to keep an eye out for rattlesnakes, scorpions and centipedes.

Less than a mile in you’ll come upon the remnants of an old rock ranch house. Mesquite and prickly pear dot the lower parts of the trail, and you’ll want to be careful on some of the tight parts of the trail to avoid scratches. You may find poison ivy near the creek as well. The drive in requires a high-clearance vehicle, but the trek is well worth it.

Established in 1984 and covering 13,600 acres, the West Clear Creek Wilderness, is a narrow but lengthy expanse that follows the contours of West Clear Creek from its western terminus at Bull Pen Ranch to the headwaters of Willow Creek and Clover Creek to the north and east. It ranges in elevation from 3,700 to 6,800 feet.

Due to the stark variance in elevation and sunlight across canyon walls, the area offers a wide range of vegetation, geology and recreational opportunities, and supports a broad range of wildlife. The three main geologic layers within the canyon are the Supai Formation, Coconino Sandstone, and volcanic deposits. The upper levels of West Clear Creek include Ponderosa pine and Douglas fir. The middle level has piñon pines and juniper.

Fishing is another pastime at West Clear Creek, which is stocked with trout by Arizona Game and Fish. The water is deep enough that it attracts swimmers when it’s warm enough.

Evidence of Sinagua-culture people, their dwellings and tools from their daily lives can still be found in the West Clear Creek drainage. The Forest Service website warns that hikers should not disturb those areas, allowing for scientific inquiry and so others can also feel and enjoy the presence of history.

Unlike national parks, wildlife refuges, or monuments, wilderness designation from Congress provides the highest level of natural-resource protection available in the world.

Directions: From Camp Verde, drive southeast on State Rt 260 for six miles to Forest Rd 618. Turn left and drive 2.2 miles to Forest Rd 215, and continue three miles to the Bull Pen Ranch Trailhead.

Stan Bindell is always looking for a good hike. If you have one, contact him at thebluesmagician@gmail. com