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Megan Merchant

Dee Cohen on Poetry


Megan Merchant, photo by Dee Cohen

For Prescott resident Megan Merchant, the world is filled with poetic possibilities. “Most poems begin with an external spark,” she says. “An overheard line, a sound, an image that tugs at something internally that wants to take form.” Her poems often arise from everyday life: “Even the most mundane experience has something to offer.” Her work touches on many subjects and themes, from birds nesting on her property to the challenges of motherhood and the heartache of grief. All are “threads that make up my life and become part of the fabric of the poem, whether I am consciously paying attention or not.”


She doesn’t always have time to pay attention. As the mother of two boys, one with special needs, she often mentally creates poems as she goes about her day, postponing their final formation until she sits down and writes. Even though poems are simmering right below the surface, she can be surprised at what develops. “I think of my mind like a junk drawer of random images, sounds, facts, etc., one I pull from when writing. In this way, it becomes a game to try and figure out how things relate, or are interconnected.” As the writing of a poem unfolds, she discovers “a dialogue between where I am in the world and what I am in the world. The external sparks help me to understand my internal world.”


As a writer and reader, poetry resonates deeply with Megan. “Poetry helps me to understand what it means to be human, to develop a greater sense of empathy and connection to other people through shared experiences.” She also loves being floored by a poem; “that little sucked-in breath of awe that happens when a poet writes something beautiful, true, or profound.”


“I wrote ‘Every day I draw a different bird’ at the beginning of lockdown, and was really feeling stuck, so I started drawing for the first time in my adult life. I wrote ‘Forget-Me-Nots’ when I was helping to care for my mother, who had a misdiagnosed brain tumor and had lost a lot of her memories and sight. At that time, writing is what helped me to be present navigating her heartbreaking decline and loss.”


These poems are examples of Megan’s gift for beautifully unsettling language. Her unique descriptions push the reader off balance in ways that reveal unexpected layers of meaning. Don’t be surprised if you react with “that little sucked-in breath of awe.”


Dee Cohen is a Prescott poet and photographer. deecohen@cox.net. Photo by Dee Cohen.



Every day I draw a different bird,

a heron — lanky, keen on watching, from a far-bank.

The crow not swept behind, whispers things I was

always meant to recall, but have shed — how to make

a slip knot from a bra strap, how to uncork a bottle

with a stone, gut a fish with an ink stain. The ravens —

bend light. Bats tendril the load-bearing walls of my

chest. They are pockets secreted in night. Hummingbirds

teach me F-minor. Then F-minor breaks me apart.

And maybe the bird is the ache is the joint, and maybe

it swallows the room with flight even when it looks,

from the window, most like a cage. Or, maybe I am

meant to sustain by envy — the slurry of gnats that

funnel from an empty can, the sweet licked all-clean.


“Every day I draw a different bird,” 2020 Michelle Boisseau Poetry Prize Winner, Bear Review


Megan Merchant lives in the tall pines of Prescott with her husband and two children. She is the author of three full-length poetry collections from Glass Lyre Press: Gravel Ghosts (2016),The Dark’s Humming (2015 Lyrebird Award Winner, 2017) and Grief Flowers (2018), four chapbooks, and a children’s book, These Words I Shaped for Y ou. Her latest book, Before the Fevered Snow, was released in April 2020. She won the 2016-2017 COG Literary Award, judged by Juan Felipe Herrera, the 2018 Beullah Rose Poetry Prize, second place in the Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry, and most recently the Inaugural Michelle Boisseau Prize. She is an editor at Pirene’s Fountain and The Comstock Review. You can find her work at meganmerchant.wix.com/poet.


Forget-Me-Nots


Today, my mother forgot the word for bathroom

while she was in one. She said, Dry room, no — wet room, no —

tell me, then what are the others called? I’d like to walk them.


At one point, someone taught me a word I’ve forgotten.

A room I was already inside. A marriage. A country. A war.


A man’s fingers cuffed around my wrist. Someone promised —

it is common, when learning another language, to lose


pieces of your mother tongue. Where the bar lights are also

a call to prayer, and the flowers aching the field are no less


yellow, the spider’s bite still poisoned, when I cannot

say their name. My mother will soon lose


my own and even though I understand the way of things,

I will hear the horses, in mourning, nip


at the electric fence, and I will not have the word for shock.


“Forget-Me-Nots” received an Honorable Mention in the Peseroff Prize Poetry Contest and was published in Before the Fever Snow.

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