Posts Tagged ‘Trapezium’

  • What’s Up?: The Orion Nebula

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, What's up?No CommentsRead More »

    By Adam England One of the most widely recognized constellations in the world is Orion. Ancient cultures from around the world identified this grouping of stars as a giant, shepherd, archer, reaper, and even a deer, pronghorn, or buffalo. Nowadays, it’s most commonly known as “The Hunter,” and is identifiable by some of the brightest stars in the night sky making up his right shoulder (Betelgeuse), left foot (Rigel), and northern end of his thee star belt (Bellatrix). Just below his belt is a tight cluster of stars known as the Trapezium, first observed by Galileo Galilei on Feb. 4, 1617. When the Trapezium is viewed through even the smallest telescopes or binoculars, one can see what is probably the most photographed and studied object in the night sky, the Orion Nebula. M42: The Orion Nebula Magnitude: +4.0 Right Ascension: 5 hr 35 min Declination: -05 Deg., 23’ ***** Visit Prescott Astronomy Club at PrescottAstronomyClub.Org. Contact them at Contact@PrescottAstronomyClub.Org. Adam England is the director-at large and in charge of public relations for the Prescott Astronomy Club

  • Prescott Astronomy Club Presents: Orion the Hunter

    By Patrick Birck Winter is a great time to explore the wonders of one of the sky’s most recognizable constellations, Orion the Hunter. On Jan. 1, Orion rises early in the evening in the eastern sky, travels across the sky throughout the night, and sets in the west in the wee hours of the morning. Throughout January, Orion rises and sets earlier each day. It contains a wide variety of interesting stars and deep sky objects. Many of Orion’s stars are visible to the naked eye, and many more are visible through a telescope or binoculars. Two of Orion’s most distinctive features are the hunter’s belt and sword. The sword, just below the belt, contains the constellation’s most famous feature, the Great Orion Nebula. From a dark viewing site, the Nebula appears to be a faint smudge, but with a telescope it becomes a large area of nebulosity (dust and gas). The nebula contains many stars, the most famous of which form Trapezium. Four relatively young, hot stars form this trapezoid. This area of Orion is known for birthing stars. The belt consists of three bright stars in a straight line and many stars of lesser brightness. The right most star, Mintaka, also known as Delta Orion (magnitude 2.2), is an obvious double star when seen through a telescope. The middle star, Alnilam, also known as Epsilon Orion (magnitude 1.7),

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