Posts Tagged ‘solar eclipse’

  • Everything under the Sun: A journey to and from the 2017 total solar eclipse

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, ColumnNo CommentsRead More »

    Story, photos, & illustrations by Dale O’Dell Given that the occurrence of a total solar eclipse is about once per continent per human lifetime, it’s highly likely that during your lifetime an eclipse will happen over the landmass on which you live. And you should see it. An eclipse is a unique astronomical event that you should witness at least once, even if you must travel a great distance. There’s nothing comparable. It can’t be overemphasized: Each and every human being should see at least one total solar eclipse. I was already planning another photo shoot when I first learned about the 2017 solar eclipse. I’d be photographing land art installations featuring automobiles including “Carhenge” in Alliance, Neb. The Aug. 21 total solar eclipse would span the entirety of the North America, and I wondered whether the shadow would fall over Nebraska. Yes, it would! The Moon’s shadow would traverse the sky directly over Alliance. I scheduled the trip and planned on shooting both “Carhenge” and the eclipse. I taught myself about solar filters, protecting my eyes and my camera’s sensor, exposure data, and all of that. I read books and astronomy websites. Many experts were saying the same thing about optimum viewing locations: The highest probability of clear skies was in the middle of the continent like in, you know, Alliance, Neb. Since it looked like I’d have company,

  • Moon dance: The total solar eclipse of 2017 comes to Prescott (and, you know, everywhere else in the U.S.)

    Jul 25, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon The last time it happened was Feb. 26, 1979. It’s been more than 38 years since that event: a total solar eclipse visible across the contiguous U.S. And, on Monday, Aug. 21, you can see it again — hey, stop staring: that’s the Sun! — from right here in good ol’ Prescott. The partial eclipse lasts two to three hours, though it won’t reach totality here. Prescott’s zenith is a 75 percent eclipse around 10:30 a.m. There’s a deluge of information about the eclipse online, but if you want to experience some local flair, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better gathering than that hosted by the Prescott Astronomy Club. From 9 a.m. through noon, at the Civic Center Amphitheater, 7501 E. Civic Circle, in P.V., there’ll be presentations, displays, hands-on activities, and more. Below, Adam England, publicity coordinator for the Prescott Astronomy Club, shares some info about the event. ***** What does the Prescott Astronomy Club have in store for the solar eclipse? The event, itself, is 9 a.m.-noon on Monday, Aug. 21. There’ll be presentations. One is from members of the Prescott Astronomy Clubs with telescopes with filters so people can view the Sun and Moon in real time. There’s also a local photography club who’ll show how to safely photograph the sun before, during, and after an eclipse, as well as any other time,

  • There’s no time like the present … except for maybe 1917

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney By now, you’re probably sick of holidays and those inevitable (and inevitably redundant and/or boring) “Year in Review” and “Top Stories of the Year” articles. Don’t pretend you’ve kept up with the papers. You’ve probably started the New Year with a stack of old news that would make the Collyer brothers balk. Instead of recapping recent events, let’s look toward the future … by looking back a century. Here’s a highly partial, by-no-means complete list of famous, infamous, or otherwise noteworthy 100-year anniversaries to ponder in 2017. (And for Alert Readers, yes, this is a nearly identical intro to a similarly themed piece for the January 2015 and January 2016 issues of 5enses. Was it any less effective?)   ***** January, 1917 • J.R.R. Tolkien begins writing “The Book of Lost Tales,” the first draft of what later becomes “The Silmarillion.” January 10, 1917 • William F. Cody (“Buffalo Bill”) dies. (Was born in 1846.) March 2, 1917 • The enactment of the Jones Act grants Puerto Ricans U.S. citizenship. March 4, 1917 • Jeannette Rankin, of Montana, becomes the first woman member of the U.S. House of Representatives. March 7, 1917 • “Livery Stable Blues,” recorded by the Original Dixieland Jass Band, becomes the first commercially released jazz recording. April 1, 1917 • Scott Joplin, ragtime pianist, dies. (Was born in 1867 or 1868.) April 14,

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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