Posts Tagged ‘Robert Blood’

  • On the Walls: Les Femmes des Montage

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Art for art’s sake is all well and good, but isn’t it even better when it benefits nonprofits and e’er-do-wells? For the third year in a row, Prescott’s Les Femmes des Montage have used their annual show — incidentally, in its 14th iteration — to raise money for the Highlands Center for Natural History. The artists span the gamut and include women who exhibit locally, nationally, and internationally. Here’s a brief list to stoke your interest: Cindi Shaffer (kiln-formed glass, photos, and printmaking), Patricia Tyser Carberry (handmade glass beads and jeweler), Jo Manginelli (weaving, wearable art, and other textiles), Carolyn Dunn (photographic art), and Barb Wills (wearables and accessories). New artists in this year’s Les Femmes des Montage show include Diane Brand (oils and acrylics), Deanne Brewster (pottery), Jody L. Miller (photography), Pam Dunmire (acrylics), and Leslee Oaks (metal and clay). Here’s your mid-year chance to stock up on holiday gifts and give back to the community at the same time. The show and sale run 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, July 14 in the Marina Room of the Hassayampa Inn, 122 E. Gurley St. That’s fairly early in the month, so mark your calendars after you finish reading this sentence.   ***** The 14th annual Les Femmes des Montage show and sale is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at the Hassayampa Inn, 122 E. Gurley St

  • Show & Tell: Natalie Krol at Sean Goté Gallery

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Absorbing, boisterous, captivating, divine, ecstatic, fecund, grandiose, halcyon, illustrious, jovial, kinetic, lustrous, masterful, nourishing, optimistic, passionate, quenchless, redolent, sensuous, transcendent, unyielding, votive, winsome, exultant, youthful, zestful. Natalie Krol’s sculptures. At Sean Goté Gallery. All July.   ***** Natalie Krol’s sculptures will be on display all July at Sean Goté Gallery, 702 W. Gurley St., 928-445-2233. Find out more at NatalieKrol.Com and SeanGote.Com. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBobby5@Gmail.Com.    

  • (It’s) For the Birds: Central Arizona Land Trust campaigns for Coldwater Farm

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Jeanne Trupiano, Coldwater Farm project manager with Central Arizona Land Trust. Find out more at CentralAZLandTrust.Org.] So what is Coldwater Farm and how did it get involved with the Central Arizona Land Trust? It’s 20 acres of land along the Agua Fria River in Dewey-Humboldt owned by Garry and Denise Rogers. They approached the Central Arizona Land Trust in 2017 with the desire to permanently protect their acreage, which spans the river there. The property contains a major Cottonwood-Willow gallery forest and perennial water, so it’s very lush, like an oasis, with very dense vegetation. They also have two large ponds that waterfowl like to use. Also in 2017, the Arizona Game and Fish Department observed two threatened or endangered bird species nesting and breeding there: the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher and the Yellow-billed Cuckoo. This is private property, though. Why does it need protection? The property has zoning that would allow for one unit for every two acres. So, whoever has the land, down the line, could develop it to that density. Eventually everything sells, and this is a way for property owners to protect sensitive areas. … Typically, it’s the landowners who approach us about this. We do some outreach and education, but typically it’s such a big decision that landowners think it

  • On the Walls: Moon Dog Kaleidoscopes

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Bugs were always fun, but it was the chandelier in our dining room that really got me. The repetition of brass and lights in geometric designs was … well, for lack of a more incisive description, really, really cool. Well that’s my short story; do you remember any of your childhood kaleidoscopes? Though often proffered to children, they’re quite remarkable optical implements. The physics behind them is straightforward, but can get much more advanced when you look at deluxe models. Speaking of deluxe models, you’ve just got to see the “Moon Dog Kaledioscopes” at Arts Prescott Cooperative this month. With skillfully crafted stained glass, these pieces by Linda Bellacicco can literally change the way you see the world. Looks like the artist’s reception was during the May 4th Friday Art Walk — whoops, my bad — but the show runs through June 20 . There’s plenty of time to catch this one. Upon further reflection (and, depending on the individual design, some refraction), it looks like you’re all set. Enjoy! ***** Visit Moon-Dog.Com to find out more about Linda Bellacicco and Moon Dog Kaleidoscopes. Visit “Moon Dog Kaleidoscopes” through June 20 at Arts Prescott Cooperative Gallery, 134 S. Montezuma St., 928-776-7717, ArtsPrescott.Com. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBoby5@Gmail.Com

  • The Write Way: McCoy teaches penmanship, old-school values

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and McCoy, artist and penmanship teacher. Find out more at McCoysWriteWay.Com.] Why teach handwriting? Well, the Constitution’s in cursive, which is a pretty good reason in and of itself. That’s finally being brought back into the classroom after 30 years of non-teaching. I actually went into the schools here and offered to come in and teach handwriting for free. I didn’t want a buck for it. But they didn’t want me. From what I’ve seen and heard, they don’t even teach cursive in the schools anymore — certainly not how they used to. When you look at the laws of this country, it’s not supposed to look like Greek. These are the rules we live by, the rules our country was founded under. You’re an artist, but surely you learned penmanship earlier than that? I did, in a Catholic school. I was taught by nuns. Legibility. You had to make the letters right. It was the only thing I was very good at in school. I got C-s or whatever in everything else. But the highest compliment anyone every paid me was that I wrote like my mom. I really liked that. I mean, I looked up to her, the way she wrote and would flourish her writing. … I’ve always considered it a compliment

  • “Walk in … Dance Out!”: Summer’s DanceWorks celebrates a decade of dance

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Summer Hinton and Russ Hausske, co-owners of Summer’s DanceWorks, who are celebrating 10 years of dance with a recital at 5:45 p.m. June 1 & 2 at Yavapai College Performing Arts Center, 1100 E. Sheldon St. Visit Summer’s DanceWorks at 805 Miller Valley Road and SummersDanceWorks.Com.] How did Summer’s DanceWorks get to where it is today? Hinton: Aug. 4, 2008 is when we officially opened our doors and started classes in a little one-room studio up the street from where we are today. I had been teaching in Prescott for 10 years before that. Hausske: It was maybe 600 square feet of floor. We also had a viewing room, but it was half the size of the one we’re sitting in today. Hinton: I taught all the classes then and Mr. Russ taught all the partner dancing. Hausske: We met on Sept. 8, 2007. I was a private investigator — actually, I’m still licensed in Arizona and California — and met her when she was looking for someone to do a master class in West Coast Swing. Hinton: For years, people had been telling me I should open a studio. Even though my dad didn’t get to see it — he passed away — he always wanted me to open my own studio. It seemed like

  • On the Walls: ‘Journeys in Spirit 2018’

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Bringing together artists from the Acoma, Apache, Choctaw, Dine’, Hopi, Yaqui, Yavapai, and Zuni cultures, “Journeys in Spirit 2018” is coming to ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery. The exhibit, which features native art in an array of mediums, runs May 17-June 19 and is co-presented with the Smoki Museum. But you can (and probably already did or should) read that in a press release. The exhibit, now in its ninth year, is great, but the real treat is a string of three days later in the month. First, 5-8 p.m. Friday, May 25 is the artists’ reception, where you can mingle with the men and women who created the pieces on display. Want to know about the interplay of traditional and contemporary influences? Come and ask the artists yourself. Then, beginning at noon on Saturday and Sunday, May 26 & 27, there’s hoop dancing and native flute music by Tony Duncan and his family at the ‘Tis Third Floor Banquet Hall. Admission’s free, but seating is limited, so pick up tickets at the ‘Tis main floor gallery after finishing reading this sentence. (I’ll wait … .) OK. Looks like you’re all set to enjoy this show in one of its many iterations. Enjoy!   ***** Visit “Journeys in Spirit 2018” May 17-June 19 at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223, TisArtGallery.Com. Opening reception

  • Planting the seed: STEM-based SciTech Fest returns

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Andy Fraher, director of STEM outreach at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, who’s hosting the fifth annual Prescott Regional SciTech Fest, 10-4 p.m. Saturday, April 21 at Embry-Riddle, 3700 Willow Creek Road. Find out more at AZSciTech.Com and Facebook.] What exactly is the Prescott Regional SciTech Fest and what happens there? It’s a festival for people drawn from organizations from the local area to focus on science and technology and innovation. It’s an opportunity for the public to see exactly what’s going on in those worlds from the perspective of Prescott and Yavapai County. Having said that, there are some presenters from outside the area. It’s a chance to get some ideas and see some of the cool new things coming up in Science Technology Engineering and Math. Why is STEM important? It’s especially important for younger people to know about the advances in technology that are taking place. They need to know how these systems work to better their own lives and, hopefully, pursue a career in those fields down the road. With STEM, some of the new innovations are solving old problems with new technology. That’s something we stress at Embry-Riddle, and I should mention it’s our first year hosting the SciTech Fest. Several student groups will be presenting, too. What’s the target age

  • Sean Patrick McDermott talks music, gigging in Prescott, & Small Songs

    Mar 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and musician Sean Patrick McDermott, who performs 7-10 p.m. Thursdays at Jersey Lily Saloon, 116 S. Montezuma St., 928-541-7854. He also performs Fridays regularly at The Point Bar & Lounge, 114 N. Montezuma St., 928-237-9027. You can purchase his EP, Small Songs, via CD Baby, Spotify, and iTunes.] How did you end up performing as Sean Patrick McDermott and how did you end up in Prescott? Well, that’s my name. I’m not sure why I use my full name for music, but I think it sounds nice. I came out to Prescott a couple of years ago and have been playing music and working at Peregrine Book Co. I grew up in Houston, Texas, and I went to music school in Nashville, Belmont University, for two years, which was kind of a crazy place. I went with a bunch of friends, and some of them are studio players now. … Being in that environment, seeing all those incredibly driven people working toward a goal, it helped me contextualize music in a different way as far as being a songwriter and trying to produce music as a kind of product. So, after I was there for a couple of years, I went back to Texas, and had visited here a couple of times, and ended up

  • On the Walls: March 2018

    Mar 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Regardless of your political and philosophical views, it’s hard to be against recycling (or, at least, unpopular; just ask Slavoj Žižek). Still, it’s easier to support such efforts than to actively take part in them. Enter Arts Prescott Cooperative Gallery. Launching March 23 with an artists’ reception during the 4th Friday Art Walk, “The 3 Rs Show: Recycle, Reuse, Reinvent!” features works by local artists who chose to use at least 50 percent recycled materials in their artistic creations. The exhibition showcases reusable materials and/or methods and includes co-op members and more than seven additional local Arizona artists. So, come see the fruits of these artists’ labors in their attempt to “take on a whole different mission than just using the blue bins each week.” The show runs through April 25, just past Earth Day, April 22. ***** Visit “The 3 Rs Show: Recycle, Reuse, Reinvent!” at Arts Prescott Cooperative Gallery, 134 S. Montezuma St., 928-776-7717, ArtsPrescott.Com. The artists’ reception and opening is 5-7 p.m. March 23 during the 4th Friday Art Walk. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBobby5@Gmail.Com

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

↓ More ↓