Posts Tagged ‘Robert Blood’

  • “Walk in … Dance Out!”: Summer’s DanceWorks celebrates a decade of dance

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Summer Hinton and Russ Hausske, co-owners of Summer’s DanceWorks, who are celebrating 10 years of dance with a recital at 5:45 p.m. June 1 & 2 at Yavapai College Performing Arts Center, 1100 E. Sheldon St. Visit Summer’s DanceWorks at 805 Miller Valley Road and SummersDanceWorks.Com.] How did Summer’s DanceWorks get to where it is today? Hinton: Aug. 4, 2008 is when we officially opened our doors and started classes in a little one-room studio up the street from where we are today. I had been teaching in Prescott for 10 years before that. Hausske: It was maybe 600 square feet of floor. We also had a viewing room, but it was half the size of the one we’re sitting in today. Hinton: I taught all the classes then and Mr. Russ taught all the partner dancing. Hausske: We met on Sept. 8, 2007. I was a private investigator — actually, I’m still licensed in Arizona and California — and met her when she was looking for someone to do a master class in West Coast Swing. Hinton: For years, people had been telling me I should open a studio. Even though my dad didn’t get to see it — he passed away — he always wanted me to open my own studio. It seemed like

  • On the Walls: ‘Journeys in Spirit 2018’

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Bringing together artists from the Acoma, Apache, Choctaw, Dine’, Hopi, Yaqui, Yavapai, and Zuni cultures, “Journeys in Spirit 2018” is coming to ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery. The exhibit, which features native art in an array of mediums, runs May 17-June 19 and is co-presented with the Smoki Museum. But you can (and probably already did or should) read that in a press release. The exhibit, now in its ninth year, is great, but the real treat is a string of three days later in the month. First, 5-8 p.m. Friday, May 25 is the artists’ reception, where you can mingle with the men and women who created the pieces on display. Want to know about the interplay of traditional and contemporary influences? Come and ask the artists yourself. Then, beginning at noon on Saturday and Sunday, May 26 & 27, there’s hoop dancing and native flute music by Tony Duncan and his family at the ‘Tis Third Floor Banquet Hall. Admission’s free, but seating is limited, so pick up tickets at the ‘Tis main floor gallery after finishing reading this sentence. (I’ll wait … .) OK. Looks like you’re all set to enjoy this show in one of its many iterations. Enjoy!   ***** Visit “Journeys in Spirit 2018” May 17-June 19 at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223, TisArtGallery.Com. Opening reception

  • Planting the seed: STEM-based SciTech Fest returns

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Andy Fraher, director of STEM outreach at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, who’s hosting the fifth annual Prescott Regional SciTech Fest, 10-4 p.m. Saturday, April 21 at Embry-Riddle, 3700 Willow Creek Road. Find out more at AZSciTech.Com and Facebook.] What exactly is the Prescott Regional SciTech Fest and what happens there? It’s a festival for people drawn from organizations from the local area to focus on science and technology and innovation. It’s an opportunity for the public to see exactly what’s going on in those worlds from the perspective of Prescott and Yavapai County. Having said that, there are some presenters from outside the area. It’s a chance to get some ideas and see some of the cool new things coming up in Science Technology Engineering and Math. Why is STEM important? It’s especially important for younger people to know about the advances in technology that are taking place. They need to know how these systems work to better their own lives and, hopefully, pursue a career in those fields down the road. With STEM, some of the new innovations are solving old problems with new technology. That’s something we stress at Embry-Riddle, and I should mention it’s our first year hosting the SciTech Fest. Several student groups will be presenting, too. What’s the target age

  • Sean Patrick McDermott talks music, gigging in Prescott, & Small Songs

    Mar 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and musician Sean Patrick McDermott, who performs 7-10 p.m. Thursdays at Jersey Lily Saloon, 116 S. Montezuma St., 928-541-7854. He also performs Fridays regularly at The Point Bar & Lounge, 114 N. Montezuma St., 928-237-9027. You can purchase his EP, Small Songs, via CD Baby, Spotify, and iTunes.] How did you end up performing as Sean Patrick McDermott and how did you end up in Prescott? Well, that’s my name. I’m not sure why I use my full name for music, but I think it sounds nice. I came out to Prescott a couple of years ago and have been playing music and working at Peregrine Book Co. I grew up in Houston, Texas, and I went to music school in Nashville, Belmont University, for two years, which was kind of a crazy place. I went with a bunch of friends, and some of them are studio players now. … Being in that environment, seeing all those incredibly driven people working toward a goal, it helped me contextualize music in a different way as far as being a songwriter and trying to produce music as a kind of product. So, after I was there for a couple of years, I went back to Texas, and had visited here a couple of times, and ended up

  • On the Walls: March 2018

    Mar 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Regardless of your political and philosophical views, it’s hard to be against recycling (or, at least, unpopular; just ask Slavoj Žižek). Still, it’s easier to support such efforts than to actively take part in them. Enter Arts Prescott Cooperative Gallery. Launching March 23 with an artists’ reception during the 4th Friday Art Walk, “The 3 Rs Show: Recycle, Reuse, Reinvent!” features works by local artists who chose to use at least 50 percent recycled materials in their artistic creations. The exhibition showcases reusable materials and/or methods and includes co-op members and more than seven additional local Arizona artists. So, come see the fruits of these artists’ labors in their attempt to “take on a whole different mission than just using the blue bins each week.” The show runs through April 25, just past Earth Day, April 22. ***** Visit “The 3 Rs Show: Recycle, Reuse, Reinvent!” at Arts Prescott Cooperative Gallery, 134 S. Montezuma St., 928-776-7717, ArtsPrescott.Com. The artists’ reception and opening is 5-7 p.m. March 23 during the 4th Friday Art Walk. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBobby5@Gmail.Com

  • On the Walls: “Feeling the Effects: Photo Impressionism Explored”

    Feb 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood When you were in school, you probably learned the primary colors as blue, red, and yellow. That’s all well and good for kiddos, but it’s flat wrong when it comes to how printing, let alone light, works. If you’re starting with white (which is all colors), you subtract colors convergent on cyan, magenta, and yellow. If you’re starting with black (which is no colors), you add blue, red, and green. (Incidentally, there’s much more to this and, not coincidentally, cyan, magenta, and yellow are the opposites of blue, red, and green.) Why am I rambling on about colors like this? Well, it’s an apology because the amazing images on this page for the upcoming “Feeling the Effects: Photo Impressionism Explored” — which runs Feb. 15- March 13 at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223, TisArtGallery.Com — have been neutered by the printing process, which reduces colors to mixtures of cyan, magenta, and yellow (plus black) thus muting the more evocative end of the color spectrum. So, with apologies to the talented Susan Walshe — who’ll be on-site 5-7 p.m. for the Feb. 23 4th Friday Art Walk artist’s reception — here are some amazing impressionistic photos that pair 19th-century French artistic sensibilities with contemporary photo-shopping. ***** Visit “Feeling the Effects: Photo Impressionism Explored” at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St.,

  • On the Walls: ‘STEPS Art Education Program Student Exhibit’

    Dec 29, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood You know who really gets art? Kids. Without the intellectual baggage of pre- and post- -isms and -ologies, they’re able to approach just about any medium with a fresh eye and creativity void of affectation or pretense. But, like anyone learning a new skill, some direction is helpful if not outright necessary. You can argue about raw talent all you want, but who couldn’t use more tools in their tool box, right? Enter the STEPS Art Education Program via ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery. Launched in 2011, the program has grown and now caters free art lessons to 5- to 16-year-olds. Class sizes are limited to maximize teacher-student interaction, and the program often draws a waiting list. Instruction varies from class to class, and many art educators use a variety of methods and approaches to encourage exploratory learning. Curious to see more? Well, you can see art by the fall 2017 coterie on display at ‘Tis in the Mezzanine Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St. You can even meet some of the budding artists noon-2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 6 during an artists’ reception. If you think these artists are just kidding around, you’re in for quite a surprise. ***** Visit the “STEPS Art Education Program Student Exhibit” Jan. 5-16 at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223, TisArtGallery.Com. The artists’ reception is noon-2 p.m. Saturday,

  • Paws for art: Clayote Studios

    Dec 29, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Dani Fisher, founder and co-owner of Clayote Studios, 8198 Spouse Drive, 610-823-3742, ClayoteStudios.Com.] How and why did you start Clayote Studios? I started Clayote Studios 23 years ago. I’m an artist and and an art teacher, and I’ve worked in public schools and psych hospitals. I learned what works and what doesn’t, and developed my own after-school program and teaching methods. … There are a lot of reasons to have an art program outside of the school. They’ve taken away the right in public schools to hug kids and they’re so worried about standards and testing and liability all the time. It’s hard to teach and reach out in that environment. What’s your background and how did you end up in Prescott Valley? I was born in Arizona. My mom does jewelry and my dad’s a carpenter, so they helped me a lot with art from a young age. I graduated from Thunderbird High School in 1992, then went to NAU, then I went back to school out east. I kept going back to school. I’m 43 and I have eight degrees. This program we’re doing has been going on for a really long time. Most of my time has been in Arizona and Pennsylvania. Mud Puppies, which is our after-school program, draws on

  • A class of their own: Sean Goté Gallery hangs Dutton abstracts & local bronzes

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood The name Allen A. Dutton should ring a bell. His black-and-white photography of Arizona landscapes and surreal photo montages are — platitudes be damned — vibrant, vital, and evocative. Despite a plethora of shows and works in other mediums, you may not have had the chance to see his abstract painting work or his fleeting but masterful bronze work. Now through the end of 2017, though, you can remedy that thanks to a show at Sean Goté Gallery. And, while you’re there, why not take in some of the jaw-droppingly masterful bronzes of Bronzesmith Fine Art foundry and Gallery. The “Bronzesmith Collection,” which runs alongside the Dutton show, features foundry proofs by the likes of Kim Obrzut, Larry Yazzie, and Oreland Joe, among others. To put it mildly, it’s a heck of a pairing. ***** Visit Sean Goté Gallery at 702 W. Gurley St., 928-445-2323, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, SeanGote.Com. The Allen A. Dutton and Bronzesmith fine Art Foundry and Art Gallery show hangs through the end of 2017. Find out more at BronzesSmith.Com. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBobby5@Gmail.Com

  • Acting out/up: ‘Dr. Wanker’s Short Adventures’ wraps up season one

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Kevin Goss, writer, producer, and star of “Dr. Wanker’s Short Adventures,” which is available on YouTube via Dr. Hans Wanker’s channel.] Why don’t you introduce us to your web series, “Dr. Wanker’s Short Adventures”? It revolves around this short actor who actually has a doctoral certificate in theater from a school in this fictitious country, Schweisenland. He comes to America on a work visa and gets a job at a community theater in Prescott. In the first episode he loses that job and falls and hits his head and has a vision of being on a movie set. So, he decides to pursue that and go to L.A. in search of a movie career. The series follows him in Hollywood going to auditions and not getting cast and having to get a job as a flower delivery person for a florist and meeting a woman. This love interest plants a seed in his head that the reason he’s not getting cast is because he’s too short and he decides to figure that one out — if that’s really the reason. Initially, he thinks it’s because of his European accent, so he goes to a vocal coach, but after that he realizes that, hey, some of the most famous actors in Hollywood have accents. Michael

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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