Posts Tagged ‘Robert Blood’

  • By torchlight: Introducing … Freefire Glass

    Nov 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Matt Faulkner, artist and owner of Freefire Glass. Contact him at FreefireGlass@Gmail.Com or at 928-235-7910.] How did you get started doing glasswork? The long version is that I was going to school at Louisiana State University, it was my freshman year, and I was in a dorm. The dorm sucked, so I found someone to rent an apartment that was in a ghetto outside of the LSU campus. It was super shady, but one of the neighbors told us they knew someone who wanted to set up their glass torch in a room nearby. We had a kitchen we weren’t really using, so we said sure, why not. I watched him and, in retrospect, this guy had no idea what he was doing and was just basically learning himself, but I was 19 years old, had never seen that before, and was really into it. We weren’t using eye protection, which is a big no-no, and after watching the torch for something like eight hours straight, I my vision was black and white. Luckily the color came back, eventually, and after that I freaked out and got the proper glasses. … I wanted to learn more, so I saved up and after a few years was able to buy my first set up with

  • Arizona District 4: Introducing … Dr. David Brill, Prescott Candidate for Congress

    Oct 5, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Dr. David Brill, Democratic candidate for Arizona Congressional District 4. Find out more about his campaign at BrillForCongress.Com.] How did you end up in Prescott? My family came as caregivers for my mother-in-law. She was a social worker at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. She was a strong woman and, after her husband died, she decided to move to Prescott so she wouldn’t constantly be babysitting grandchildren. Fast-forward 20 years and each of the six kids is flying out for a week or two every year to take care of mom because her health is failing. At the time I was working at the VA in New York, so I was pretty much free to move around the country in the VA system. The roots came up from the ground for all three of my kids and my wife, so it was kind of miraculous. I took a position in Telehealth for the Hopi and Navajo Nations from the Prescott VA. We came out in 2010. For two years I built up that telemedicine program and, finally, for all of the Southwest from Arizona to western Texas. Did your perception of Prescott match what you experienced when you first moved here? Before I came, I got rid of all my gardening tools and tree-pruning

  • Cut (or, better yet, collect) a rug: Navajo rug auction returns to Smoki

    Aug 31, 18 • ndemarino • UncategorizedNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Cindy Gresser, executive director of the Smoki Museum of American Indian Art & Culture. The annual Navajo Rug & Indian Art Auction is Friday and Saturday, Sept. 14 & 15. The mini-auction is 5 p.m. Sept. 14, the main auction preview is 9-11 a.m. Sept. 15, and the main auction is noon Sept. 15, all at Smoki Museum, 147 N. Arizona Ave., 928-445-1230, SmokiMuseum.Org.]   So what can you tell us about the Smoki’s Navajo rug auction? It’s now in its 22nd year. The rug auction is a fundraising event for the museum, obviously, but also an opportunity to introduce the public to the incredible art of our native people. Navajo weaving has been the lifeblood of their economy since the incursion of Euro-Americans onto this continent and it’s still a major economic factor in what they do every day. It’s important to make sure the Navajo weavers are still weaving and markets like ours ensure the public has access to their creations. How’s the art form changed over the years? A lot of weaving started with simple, basic patterns. Now, native people are doing incredible works of art that are constantly evolving. As new weavers are coming onto the scene, they’re changing designs. It’s no longer specific areas doing specific simple patterns. Now

  • On the Walls: ‘Faces & Figures’ + ‘2 Creative Cronies from Cordes’

    Aug 3, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Two shows featuring two artists swapping places in the middle of the month on the middle, mezzanine floor in the middle of downtown Prescott. It’s two too much, I tells ya, two too much! The first show is “Faces & Figures” and features clay works by Saveria Judge and paintings by Maryhelen Ewing. The show runs from the time you read this through Aug. 14. The second show is “2 Creative Cronies from Cordes” and features mixed media by Judy Kaufman and welded steel by Darrell Woods. The show runs from Aug. 15-Sept. 14. Both shows are in the mezzanine at ‘Tis Arts Center & Gallery. The opening reception for “Faces & Figures” already happened — thus is the curse of a printing schedule — but, thankfully, you can probably make the reception for “2 Creative Cronies from Cordes” — as well as for another show, “Highlands Center for Natural History and ‘Tis Fine art Photography” during this month’s 4th Friday Art Walk. It’s time to double down on art. ***** Visit “Faces & Figures” through Aug. 14 and “2 Creative Cronies from Cordes” from Aug. 15 to Sept. 14 at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223, TisArtGallery.Com. Opening reception for the latter is 5-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24 during the monthly 4th Friday Art Walk Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer

  • On the Walls: Les Femmes des Montage

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Art for art’s sake is all well and good, but isn’t it even better when it benefits nonprofits and e’er-do-wells? For the third year in a row, Prescott’s Les Femmes des Montage have used their annual show — incidentally, in its 14th iteration — to raise money for the Highlands Center for Natural History. The artists span the gamut and include women who exhibit locally, nationally, and internationally. Here’s a brief list to stoke your interest: Cindi Shaffer (kiln-formed glass, photos, and printmaking), Patricia Tyser Carberry (handmade glass beads and jeweler), Jo Manginelli (weaving, wearable art, and other textiles), Carolyn Dunn (photographic art), and Barb Wills (wearables and accessories). New artists in this year’s Les Femmes des Montage show include Diane Brand (oils and acrylics), Deanne Brewster (pottery), Jody L. Miller (photography), Pam Dunmire (acrylics), and Leslee Oaks (metal and clay). Here’s your mid-year chance to stock up on holiday gifts and give back to the community at the same time. The show and sale run 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, July 14 in the Marina Room of the Hassayampa Inn, 122 E. Gurley St. That’s fairly early in the month, so mark your calendars after you finish reading this sentence.   ***** The 14th annual Les Femmes des Montage show and sale is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at the Hassayampa Inn, 122 E. Gurley St

  • Show & Tell: Natalie Krol at Sean Goté Gallery

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Absorbing, boisterous, captivating, divine, ecstatic, fecund, grandiose, halcyon, illustrious, jovial, kinetic, lustrous, masterful, nourishing, optimistic, passionate, quenchless, redolent, sensuous, transcendent, unyielding, votive, winsome, exultant, youthful, zestful. Natalie Krol’s sculptures. At Sean Goté Gallery. All July.   ***** Natalie Krol’s sculptures will be on display all July at Sean Goté Gallery, 702 W. Gurley St., 928-445-2233. Find out more at NatalieKrol.Com and SeanGote.Com. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBobby5@Gmail.Com.    

  • (It’s) For the Birds: Central Arizona Land Trust campaigns for Coldwater Farm

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Jeanne Trupiano, Coldwater Farm project manager with Central Arizona Land Trust. Find out more at CentralAZLandTrust.Org.] So what is Coldwater Farm and how did it get involved with the Central Arizona Land Trust? It’s 20 acres of land along the Agua Fria River in Dewey-Humboldt owned by Garry and Denise Rogers. They approached the Central Arizona Land Trust in 2017 with the desire to permanently protect their acreage, which spans the river there. The property contains a major Cottonwood-Willow gallery forest and perennial water, so it’s very lush, like an oasis, with very dense vegetation. They also have two large ponds that waterfowl like to use. Also in 2017, the Arizona Game and Fish Department observed two threatened or endangered bird species nesting and breeding there: the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher and the Yellow-billed Cuckoo. This is private property, though. Why does it need protection? The property has zoning that would allow for one unit for every two acres. So, whoever has the land, down the line, could develop it to that density. Eventually everything sells, and this is a way for property owners to protect sensitive areas. … Typically, it’s the landowners who approach us about this. We do some outreach and education, but typically it’s such a big decision that landowners think it

  • On the Walls: Moon Dog Kaleidoscopes

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, On the WallsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Bugs were always fun, but it was the chandelier in our dining room that really got me. The repetition of brass and lights in geometric designs was … well, for lack of a more incisive description, really, really cool. Well that’s my short story; do you remember any of your childhood kaleidoscopes? Though often proffered to children, they’re quite remarkable optical implements. The physics behind them is straightforward, but can get much more advanced when you look at deluxe models. Speaking of deluxe models, you’ve just got to see the “Moon Dog Kaledioscopes” at Arts Prescott Cooperative this month. With skillfully crafted stained glass, these pieces by Linda Bellacicco can literally change the way you see the world. Looks like the artist’s reception was during the May 4th Friday Art Walk — whoops, my bad — but the show runs through June 20 . There’s plenty of time to catch this one. Upon further reflection (and, depending on the individual design, some refraction), it looks like you’re all set. Enjoy! ***** Visit Moon-Dog.Com to find out more about Linda Bellacicco and Moon Dog Kaleidoscopes. Visit “Moon Dog Kaleidoscopes” through June 20 at Arts Prescott Cooperative Gallery, 134 S. Montezuma St., 928-776-7717, ArtsPrescott.Com. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBoby5@Gmail.Com

  • The Write Way: McCoy teaches penmanship, old-school values

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and McCoy, artist and penmanship teacher. Find out more at McCoysWriteWay.Com.] Why teach handwriting? Well, the Constitution’s in cursive, which is a pretty good reason in and of itself. That’s finally being brought back into the classroom after 30 years of non-teaching. I actually went into the schools here and offered to come in and teach handwriting for free. I didn’t want a buck for it. But they didn’t want me. From what I’ve seen and heard, they don’t even teach cursive in the schools anymore — certainly not how they used to. When you look at the laws of this country, it’s not supposed to look like Greek. These are the rules we live by, the rules our country was founded under. You’re an artist, but surely you learned penmanship earlier than that? I did, in a Catholic school. I was taught by nuns. Legibility. You had to make the letters right. It was the only thing I was very good at in school. I got C-s or whatever in everything else. But the highest compliment anyone every paid me was that I wrote like my mom. I really liked that. I mean, I looked up to her, the way she wrote and would flourish her writing. … I’ve always considered it a compliment

  • “Walk in … Dance Out!”: Summer’s DanceWorks celebrates a decade of dance

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Summer Hinton and Russ Hausske, co-owners of Summer’s DanceWorks, who are celebrating 10 years of dance with a recital at 5:45 p.m. June 1 & 2 at Yavapai College Performing Arts Center, 1100 E. Sheldon St. Visit Summer’s DanceWorks at 805 Miller Valley Road and SummersDanceWorks.Com.] How did Summer’s DanceWorks get to where it is today? Hinton: Aug. 4, 2008 is when we officially opened our doors and started classes in a little one-room studio up the street from where we are today. I had been teaching in Prescott for 10 years before that. Hausske: It was maybe 600 square feet of floor. We also had a viewing room, but it was half the size of the one we’re sitting in today. Hinton: I taught all the classes then and Mr. Russ taught all the partner dancing. Hausske: We met on Sept. 8, 2007. I was a private investigator — actually, I’m still licensed in Arizona and California — and met her when she was looking for someone to do a master class in West Coast Swing. Hinton: For years, people had been telling me I should open a studio. Even though my dad didn’t get to see it — he passed away — he always wanted me to open my own studio. It seemed like

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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