Posts Tagged ‘Reva Sherrard’

  • Myth & Mind: Furies & hunts

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard King Agamemnon’s ships lay in harbor, manned and ready to sail to war in Troy, awaiting a wind that wouldn’t come. As days crawled past a plague spread in the still air under the drooping sails. With more and more of his army sickening and the outcome of the war in the balance, Agamemnon chose to sacrifice his daughter, Iphigenia, to gain divine favor. When the girl’s throat was cut a wind sprang up, scoured the plague from the army’s lungs and drove the ships to Troy. Queen Clytemnestra grieved wildly for her daughter. While her husband was at war she turned for comfort to his rival Aegisthus. When Agamemnon returned victorious, bringing a captive princess as his prize and concubine, the lovers killed them both. It was now the duty of Orestes, Agamemnon and Clytemnestra’s son, to avenge his father’s murder. He slew his mother and her lover with his own hand. But the crime of matricide woke the Erinyes, or Furies, goddesses of punishment. Relentlessly they pursued Orestes and drove him mad. ***** What are the Erinyes? Etymologically, erinys (Greek, singular) likely means just what the Romans glossed it as: fury. These female powers are older than the Olympians, representing an equally ancient law. The laws and cultural values — and breaches thereof — embodied by Zeus and company belong to the machinery of civilization,

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: December 2017

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Architecture on the Carpet” By Brenda & Robert Vale This is definitely not a book for everyone because it’s focused on a single subject. However, to this reader, it’s absolutely fascinating to see the comparison between the birth of construction toys and modern architecture. ~Joe “Weird Love” By Clizia Gussoni & Craig Yoe It’s difficult to describe why I found myself drawn to the point of obsession with this series of comics. They read like strange soap operas from the 1950s. It’s absurd kitsch. I guess they just feel like home to me. ~Joe Mystifyingly absorbing and entertaining vignettes of some truly weird loves indeed. I’ve had many an incredulous laugh over these satisfyingly pulpy bits. ~Reva “The White Road” By Edmund de Waal A thorough examination of porcelain’s long history, beauty, and how it has enchanted cultures for years. ~Lacey “Coming to my Senses” By Alice Waters With language that is straightforward and simple, it doesn’t take long to realize Alice Waters is sharp, witty, and brave. ~Lacey “Down and Out in Paris and London” By George Orwell With rebellious clarity, Orwell’s reflections on the reality of extreme poverty in Paris and London are both sobering and graphic. ~Lacey “The Book of the Cat” By Angus Hyland Famous artists show some love for our furry friends. My new favorite book. ~Susannah Exquisite, witty, reverent renderings

  • Myth & Mind: Harvests, hops, & human sacrifice

    Nov 3, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard Autumn has arrived. The wind changed almost overnight: one day towing monsoon clouds from the southwest in summer’s established pattern, then suddenly restive, keeping the trees awake after dark and setting a fresher edge on the mornings. The light, compressed a minute at a time by approaching winter, became a little clearer, more insistently golden. The wind’s mood in autumn, a combination of restlessness and certainty, has always made this season my favorite. The year is setting out on a journey whose destination is death. To the ancient Celts, the germinant sleep of death preceded life; nightfall was the day’s beginning, and the beginning of winter was the new year. The festival of Samhain (SOW-inn), falling in early November, marks not merely the first day of winter but a resetting of the cosmic mechanism at a fundamental level. To pastoral-agrarian ancestors, winter’s onset meant it was time to move the herds down from the highlands to more sheltered pastures, time to reap and store the rich life of summer before harshening weather took it away, but furthermore the crux of nature’s cyclical drama of death and rebirth. As such it was a dangerous season: The doors between worlds stood open, and one might easily wander inside the hills where the race of fairy-folk lived — especially considering the marathon drinking bouts the Irish engaged in as a

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: November 2017

    Nov 3, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Second Sex” By Simone de Beauvoir Along with “The Feminine Mystique,” de Beauvoir’s “The Second Sex” is one of the quintessential tomes on mid-century women’s liberation. ~ Lacey   “The Book of Emma Reyes” By Emma Reyes Reading “The Book of Emma Reyes” is like holding the key to a secret door. An incredible story of self-discovery, resilience, and courage. ~ Lacey   “In the Cafe of Lost Youth” By Patrick Modiano Master of the hauntingly beautiful, Modiano weaves a world you won’t want to leave. Skillfully layered with the themes of emotion, identity, and human behavior. ~ Lacey   “The Trial” By Franz Kafka Waking up to being accused of a crime and not being told what it is, to supposedly being under arrest but not apprehended and taken to jail, is an odd way to start the day. ~ Joe   “Sanctuary” By William Faulkner This is my favorite in Faulkner’s oeuvre. Part Southern Gothic, part noir, and strangely elegant. Sanctuary is the book to read on a late summer night. ~ Joe   “The Boys from Brazil” By Ira Levin A Nazi hunter plays detective, searching for Josef Mengele, who is rumored to be in South America concocting a frightening experiment. (As absurd as it sounds, this book is a thrilling page turner). ~ Joe   “Finnegans Wake” By James Joyce The

  • Myth & Mind: Restless riders

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard In 1127, the chronicler of Peterborough Abbey in central England recorded an alarming event. Both monks and local townsfolk “saw and heard a great number of huntsmen hunting. The huntsmen were black, huge, and hideous, and rode on black horses and on black he-goats, and their hounds were jet black, with eyes like saucers, and horrible. … [In] the night the monks heard them sounding and winding their horns.” (From the “Peterborough Chronicle,” translator G. N. Garmonsway) Witnesses reported this frightening spectacle for weeks; it began in midwinter and only ended at Easter. This was not a mortal cavalcade. The people of Peterborough had seen the Wild Hunt. These were troubled times for England, and Peterborough Abbey was no exception. Only 10 years previously, some drunken monks had been responsible for a fire that destroyed their library; seven years later a succession crisis would plunge the country into cataclysmic civil war, and fill the chronicle’s pages with accounts of tortures inflicted on the common people. The conquest of England by William of Normandy in 1066 had violently uprooted Saxon society, traumatized the island’s patchwork of Germanic and Celtic cultures, and threatened the language with extinction. Taxes to enforce the new order came directly from those who could spare the least. Starvation was rampant. This was the age that gave rise to the legends of Robin Hood, the

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: October 2017

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Ice Virgin” By Hans Christian Andersen This recently translated novella by the master of the modern fairy tale contains passage after passage of exquisite beauty and psychological profundity that made me understand, for the first time, Andersen’s enduring place in world literature. A Swiss alpinist most at home in the mountain wilderness courts a sophisticated village girl, in defiance of the ferocious Ice Virgin who waits to claim him as her own. ~ Reva “The Outrun” By Amy Liptrot A woman returns to her childhood home in the windswept Orkney Islands to recover from devastating alcoholism in this sensuously vivid memoir. To save herself Liptrot throws herself into astronomy and cold-water swimming with compelling determination and openness to the chilling natural beauty of the remote islands. ~ Reva “Taco Loco” By Jonas Cramby A cookbook that takes you to the streets of Mexico and introduces the very best of their street foods: Tacos. Learn to make all the essentials and enjoy the beautiful pictures. ~ Susannah   “Pachinko” By Min Jin Lee An engrossing, emotional, and richly detailed story that spans both world wars. Follows four generations of Koreans on their journey and the struggles of surviving in exile from their homeland — it all feels painfully real. ~ Susannah   “Desert Solitaire” By Edward Abbey No other author I’ve found writes more eloquently about the

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: September 2017

    Sep 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Plainwater” By Anne Carson Both intimate and dazzling, my favorite essay from this collection is “Part V: The Anthropology of Water,” where Carson takes the reader on a pilgrimage in search of water. ~Lacey “Too Much and Not the Mood: Essays” By Durga Chew-Bose With intense lyricism, Chew-Bose ruminates on moments of her childhood and what it means to be a creative woman today. Both memoir and cultural criticism, “Too Much and Not the Mood” is poignant, philosophical, and deeply personal. ~Lacey “Sophie Calle: True Stories” By Sophie Calle As a writer, photographer, installation artist, and conceptual artist, Sophie Calle presents something unique, absorbing, and honest with “True Stories.” ~Lacey “My Dyslexia” By Phillip Schultz Required reading for anyone who has ever been made to feel broken or unimportant due to a learning disability. Schultz will revive your belief in the beauty and extraordinary intelligence that come thanks to, rather than in spite of, learning disabilities. ~Bekah “Catching the Big Fish” By David Lynch Yes, it’s a book by the film director David Lynch. Sparse and minimal, Lynch explores the creative process by homing in on the idea of sparking the fire from within. Surrealism and Transcendental Meditation collide! ~Joe “Summerlong” By Dean Bakopoulos A novel of surburban love both marital and extramarital. Tender, funny, and irresistible. ~Michaela “A Visit from the Goon Squad” By Jennifer

  • Myth & Mind: Óðinn’s ecstatic fury

    Jul 25, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard I know that I hung the windswept tree upon, nights full nine, spear-wounded and given to Óðinn, self to myself on that tree that no one knows whence its roots run. With loaf they heartened me not nor with horn, I peered down, I took up the runes, screaming took them, I fell back from there. -Rúnatal On the brink of a terrible battle that would pit him against cherished friends and relatives, the Indian Prince Arjuna quailed in painful moral turmoil and threw down his bow, refusing to fight. His charioteer Krishna — the god Vishnu in flesh — counseled him to embrace his destiny as a warrior and to recognize the path fate had laid before him as something far greater than his own limited understanding. Transfigured by Krishna’s teaching, which comprises the “Bhagavad Gita” segment of the epic poem “Mahabharata,” Arjuna led his army to victory. When Harald Wartooth, a great eighth-century Scandinavian king, felt the shadow of death from old age fall over him he challenged his friend Sigurd Ring to an almighty battle. Harald in his youth had vowed to dedicate all those he slew in war to Óðinn (Odin), and in return the god granted him untold military success and dominion over lands from Northumbria, to western Norway, to Estonia. In the blinding heat of his last battle the king forgot

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: August 2017

    Jul 25, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Annihilation” By Jeff Vandermeer This short novel has such a thick, ominous sense of atmosphere that it almost creeps off the pages in a musky fog. A little bit of Bradbury, a little more of Lovecraft, and a lot of something new that evades comparison. ~Sean “Seven Brief Lessons on Physics” By Carlo Rovelli Direct and elegant. Gain a better understanding of the fundamental laws that govern our universe. Maybe if you memorize them you’ll get special powers or something. ~Sean “Legacy of Ashes” By Tim Weiner This book is a comprehensive chronicle of the achievements and foibles of the CIA since its origin as the OSS in the early 21st century. ~Joe “Complete Stories” By Clarice Lispector Lispector writes in a way that allows you to feel as if you know her characters intimately, to comfortably exist in the space she has created for them, and to feel every emotion and thought they have, in just a few short lines. Feelings that only intensify as you continue to read. ~Lacey “Speedboat” By Renata Adler Adler forces you to look at your surroundings with new eyes, question those seemingly insignificant meetings with strangers, and explore your curiosity as she grants glimpses into the special oddities of her life. Adler disregards the rules of the novel with unexpected ease as she takes you on a journey through

  • Myth & Mind: In the halls of the mountain kings

    Jun 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard Winter or summer, it’s cold in the mountain. The last time the sun touched this place was in the age when oxygen first accumulated in the atmosphere, hundreds to thousands of millions of years ago. It has been very quiet until now. I am on a bus, one of the modern heated fleet that punctually connects the villages of Western Norway to the towns and rail centers without fail, except in cases of natural disaster. The drivers are curt, competent, and speak no English. I am counting the minutes we have been inside the mountains and watching the kilometers tick by, four at a time, till we are out in the daylight world again. This is the Lærdal-Aurland tunnel in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway, at 24.51 kilometers (15.23 miles) the world’s longest — but I didn’t know that when after a series of lesser entombments we entered this timeless hole. At three places along its length the tunnel widens and glows with eerily intense blue light, fading pale towards the ground, and you think you have begun to hallucinate. But it’s part of the design, meant to imitate sunrise according to the government. It does not. If anything it says you have left the living world behind and entered a place where flame burns blue yet gives no heat; you have been taken into the mountain

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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