Posts Tagged ‘Reva Sherrard’

  • Myth & Mind: Thor, Strength & sudden light

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard Thor had a mind to go fishing. Striking the head off a bull to use as bait, he demanded the giant Hymir take him out in his boat. Far they rowed out to sea. Hymir caught two whales on his line. “We’ll turn back now,” he said. “It’s not good to go into deeper waters than this.” But Thor rowed on, and where there was no bottom to the sea and the sky closed grimly over the tops of black swells rearing higher than mountains, he cast his bait down on a long, long line and waited. Soon a bite nearly wrenched the line from his grasp. The giant’s boat juddered on the dark water, its planks creaking, as Thor braced himself and pulled with all his might. With a roar as if the very ocean rose against him, the terrible head of the Midgard Serpent breached the deep and yawned over the boat, Thor’s iron hook wedged fast in its jaw. They say that none have seen fearful things who did not see this: the massy weed-hung head of the world-encircling snake disorganizing the swells, deadly venom dribbling from its jaws, and Thor staring back in awful fury while thunder growled in the clouds overhead and lightning stabbed red from his eyes. As the thunder god reached for his hammer, Hymir, in terror, cut the fishing-line,

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: March 2017

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Walking to Martha’s Vineyard” By Franz Wright Every word of this moving poetry collection is worth reading, more than once, while sipping tea (or whiskey), in front of the fireplace, while petting the cat. ~Jon “Every Time I Find the Meaning of Life, They Change It” By Daniel Klein This philosophy book is fun and easy to read. You read that right: fun and easy. Two words you wouldn’t normally use to describe a philosophy book. The author has made a craft of making philosophy something everyone can read, but it doesn’t take away from any of the big ideas throughout. ~Jon “High-Rise” By J. G. Ballard I dare you: read the first sentence, then try to look away. Ha ha haaa. Ballard’s psychological thriller is a diabolically perspicacious, riveting free-fall into absolute social collapse. ~Reva “The Devourers” By Indra Das Holy hell, is this book good. Das’ shapeshifter novel soars above its predecessors in both substance and style, a mesmerizing tale of were-predators and the twinned natures of humankind. The writing has real literary merit, mingling gruesomeness and beauty in ardent descriptive language. The concepts are original and convincing. I’m telling you, good stuff! ~Reva “Fortunately, the Milk” By Neil Gaiman This book has it all: A dinosaur, pirates, a volcano god, aliens, ponies, wumpires, and, fortunately, the milk. ~Veri “Perdido Street Station” By China

  • Myth & Mind: The drinking horn full of the oceans

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard What is myth? Raven stealing the light, Athena bursting fully-armored from Zeus’ forehead, and so on? Where did these stories come from and why? Well — once upon a time — our primate ancestors lived, ate, loved, and died just like other animals and needed nothing more. Like wolves and chimpanzees, we hunted cooperatively and communicated using indicative vocalizations. Then language happened, and from thinking largely in concrete facts we started thinking in symbols. We made the cognitive leaps from grunting when we saw antelope, to having a specific sound that meant “antelope,” to using it when there were none around. Suddenly we had more to think about apart from whether or not we could run the antelope down; now we were concerned with meaning, and lo, through one of evolution’s stranger vicissitudes the human consciousness was born. Language and the super-complex brains it built gave our sorry, furless ancestors the cooperative and imaginative edge they needed to survive. But now, those complex brains found equal complexity in otherwise straightforward struggles to get food, mate, fight, and resolve fights. Life had a new dimension for which meat and copulation alone were not enough (well, for some of us). We needed to find a working truce with the loneliness and fear that go hand-in-hand with speculative thought; we needed not just physical but psychological strength to outwit death

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: February 2017

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Three Moments of an Explosion” By China Miéville A collection of short stories, ranging from somewhat odd to completely absurd. The range of styles and moods expressed in Miéville’s work is impressive to say the least. For a quick taste, I’d recommend “The Rope Is The World” and “The Crawl.” ~Sean “And Then There Were None” By Agatha Christie Arguably the single best story penned by the most popular mystery author of all time. “And Then There Were None” is full of subtle guidance and misdirection; I challenge any reader who claims to have predicted the simply unpredictable conclusion of this timeless mystery. ~Sean “Based On A True Story” By Norm Macdonald At first glance, Macdonald’s book seems like the typical autobiography you’ve come to expect from a comedian. However, the brilliance of the novel is that it’s an “honest” work of fiction with bits of truth sprinkled in. ~Joe “Home” By Carson Ellis Beautiful illustrations. Wonderful storyline. Open it up and see! ~Jon “Into The Dark” By Mark Vieira Simply put: This book is packed with absolutely gorgeous black & white stills from the Noir era of crime films in the ’40s/’50s. My favorite book in the store. ~Joe “Despair” By Vladimir Nabokov A story of doubles and dopplegangers. Pay very close attention to each paragraph, sentence and word with this story because as soon

  • The sweet fruit of the dead: A consideration of life after death before birth

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard The girl was called Kore, “maiden,” and Neotera, “younger.” She was full to bursting with youth, life, and beauty, and all adored her. One day the ground yawned under her feet, and Hades, lord of the dead, carried Kore down from the fields of grain and poppies to his realm deep within the earth. Without the maiden, seeds did not sprout, buds withered before they could turn to fruits or flowers, and crops died in the fields. There could be no new life, no food. Only age and wintry barrenness were on the grieving earth. Under the earth, grapes and persimmons, apples and pomegranates throve, perfumed and plump. Kore was hungry but dared not eat, for to eat the fruit of the realm of the dead would bind her to it. A beautiful pomegranate in Hades’ garden caught her eye. Its rind flushed like a dancer’s cheeks, and it swelled as tautly round as a belly about to give birth, so rich with ripe life it seemed to sing to her. Such a fruit could do her no harm. She reached out and plucked it, and hesitated, feeling its weight in her palm. Then with her nails she tore through the thick skin and bit a mouthful of slippery crimson seeds. Nothing in all the world was ever so sweet, so fulfilling, so good. The blood-red juice

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: January 2017

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Herzog” By Saul Bellow Reflections on past mistakes with friends, enemies, family and lovers through anecdotes and unsent letters, Moses Herzog sifts through the highs and lows of his life in order to understand what has brought him to his current state. Semi-autobiographical, humorous and painful, Bellow writes directly from the heart with bare honesty and emotion. ~Joe “Through the Woods” By Emily Carroll These stories are spooky. Plain and simple. Odd little creepies round every corner. I highly recommend this book to anyone that may not be a fan of comic books but loves a good scary tale. I also highly recommend this book to all the comic book fanatics out there. For fans of Neil Gaiman and Joe Hill. ~Jon “A Place Called Home” By Mr. Jason Grant Jason Grant’s job is styling homes for photo shoots, but he doesn’t believe we need to create these “perfect” homes in real life. In “A Place Called Home,” Jason shows that the most inspiring homes are relaxed, casual, and have good energy and aren’t just filled with designer furniture. A great book even if you’re just needing something for your coffee table. ~Lacey “All the Birds, Singing” By Evie Wyld Jake, a newcomer to the wind-raked English community where she runs her sheep farm alone, suspects an unknown animal is killing her flock one by one

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: December 2016

    Dec 2, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Nausea” By Jean-Paul Sartre When the things you enjoy in life start to make you sick, you are free to choose how to accept or reject everything. ~Joe “Tintin: Hergé’s Masterpiece” By Pierre Sterckx A sublime art book & illuminating glimpse at the themes and consummate artistry behind the beloved comic strip’s seeming simplicity. ~Reva “Adulthood Is a Myth” By Sarah Andersen This made me LOL — a lot. And I’ve been an adult (supposedly) for a while now! ~Michaela “The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko” By Scott Stambach This book is filled with brutal honesty. It is a testament to being human. This book made me laugh, it made me think, it made me empathize, and then it made me cry. Happy tears, then sad tears, and then it made me think some more, and then it made me happy to be alive. If you are pondering reading this book, then, without hesitation, I plead with you to just do it. Read it. Now. Forget all else and join Ivan in Belarus. ~Jon “The Secret Lives of People in Love” By Simon Van Booy Not only a story of love between men and women but a story that explores the love between parent and child, the bond between men in war, the brief love that can be found between strangers, and love that is lost

  • A part of the hol(l)e: Considering life, death, & land via Skađi & Holle

    Sep 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard After the gods slew the mighty giant Thjazi, his daughter Skađi stormed the gates of Asgard to take revenge. She was the deity of ski travel and hunting, and she descended on the fortress of the gods with all the awful power and majesty of the snowy mountain reaches where she made her home. Anxious to placate her, the gods offered to give what compensation she demanded. “Very well,” she said, “since you took my father from me, I’ll take one of you for my husband.” The gods consulted, and agreed that the unwed men among them would offer themselves to be chosen — but only by the sight of their feet. Skađi had her eye on Baldr, the handsomest of the gods. So when they lined up behind a curtain with only their bare white feet peeping out below, she strode immediately to the smoothest, best-groomed, and freshest-looking pair and announced her choice. Imagine her shock when the curtain dropped to reveal that she had chosen Njorđ, the weatherbeaten sea god, whose seaweed-hung beard and driftwood skin were a far cry from Baldr’s golden comeliness. But Skađi was a goddess of her word, and accepted Njorđ as her husband. “One thing more,” she said, casting a regretful glance at Baldr’s ill-clipped toenails. “I can see I’ll get little mirth from the man you’ve given me. Before

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: October 2016

    Sep 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Captain Asks for a Show of Hands” By Nick Flynn The subject matter in this particular collection is a lucid encounter with a dreamer. Nick Flynn’s ability to hook you with but a few words is a skill few possess. Sit back and slowly read the beautifully sparse poems and you’ll say to yourself, Well, gosh golly, he may be onto something. ~Jon “Lives in Ruins” By Marilyn Johnson Although archaeologists love Indiana Jones (they really do) their lives couldn’t be more different from his. So who are the wild and quirky characters on their hands and knees digging and sifting through the dirt looking for ruins? The ones who live in their cars because being an archeologist doesn’t pay well? Johnson’s curiosity takes her on a journey to answer these questions. Digging alongside experts with her on a sugar plantation, hunting bodies in New Jersey, and drinking ancient beverages, we discover the incredible men and women unearthing the objects of our past. It was hard to finish this, only because I didn’t want to say goodbye to all the incredible people I had been reading about. ~Lacey “The Butterflies of North America” By Titian Peale This reproduction of Titian Peale’s lost manuscript is exquisite. The paintings are phenomenal. The pages are printed on extremely high quality paper, and the book smells of a dank

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: September 2016

    Aug 26, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Seven Brief Lessons on Physics” By Carlo Rovelli Carlo Rovelli writes about some of the fundamental laws governing our universe with a direct simplicity that is rare in scientific literature. He acknowledges the inevitable gaps in his explanations, but does a remarkable job communicating complete ideas in a small space. This book is for anyone who wants to gain a basic understanding of the most brilliant ideas ever conceived (and what they mean for us as human beings), regardless of scientific background. — Sean “The Vegetarian” By Han Kang WOW!!! I couldn’t put this book down, it was my top priority. This is an incredibly strange dreamlike novel. This is R- rated and not for the fainthearted. — David “Blood Song” By Anthony Davis Anthony Ryan’s debut novel is about as well-written and enthralling as high fantasy gets. The pace is perfect right from the beginning, the characters are complex yet relatable, and the setting strikes a balance between magical and entirely believable. Definitely a great distraction for fans of Martin or Rothfuss who are eagerly awaiting more great fantasy. — Sean “Anatomy of Violence” By Adrian Raine Neuroscience and criminology! One of the best researchers in his field. — Caleb “In the Wolf’s Mouth” By Adam Foulds Foulds captures the bewildering impact of war and violence with precise, shattered lyricism. The narrative voices of his

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

↓ More ↓