Posts Tagged ‘Peregrine Book Co.’

  • A life & death matter: Stephen Jenkinson talks about dying wisely

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Stephen Jenkinson, teacher, author, and subject of the documentary “Griefwalker.” Jenkinson is in Prescott for three events. He’s speaking 3-4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10 at Peregrine Book Co., 219 N. Cortez St. He’ll be at a screening of “Griefwalker,” 7-9:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10 at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Davis Learning Center, 3700 Willow Creek Road, $25. He’s giving one of his signature talks, “Die Wise: Making meaning of the Ending of Days,” 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at the ERAU Davis Learning Center, 3700 Willow Creek Road, $115. Find out more and purchase tickets at OrphanWisdom.Com.] You’re known for speaking and writing about dying and death. How did you get into that? Well, I’m not employed by anybody; it’s an arbitrary call in that sense. I don’t have a job title or anything like that. The entire enterprise is self-appointed. The intention is to call into deep question the prevailing attitudes in the death trade. It’s a task I’ve given myself. What can people expect from your talks? You’re asking me about people’s expectations and that’s for them to answer, not me. The easiest way to say it is that I’m not in the customer satisfaction business. I’m not selling anything. What people’s expectations are, I couldn’t begin to guess. I could say that even if you

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: October 2017

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Ice Virgin” By Hans Christian Andersen This recently translated novella by the master of the modern fairy tale contains passage after passage of exquisite beauty and psychological profundity that made me understand, for the first time, Andersen’s enduring place in world literature. A Swiss alpinist most at home in the mountain wilderness courts a sophisticated village girl, in defiance of the ferocious Ice Virgin who waits to claim him as her own. ~ Reva “The Outrun” By Amy Liptrot A woman returns to her childhood home in the windswept Orkney Islands to recover from devastating alcoholism in this sensuously vivid memoir. To save herself Liptrot throws herself into astronomy and cold-water swimming with compelling determination and openness to the chilling natural beauty of the remote islands. ~ Reva “Taco Loco” By Jonas Cramby A cookbook that takes you to the streets of Mexico and introduces the very best of their street foods: Tacos. Learn to make all the essentials and enjoy the beautiful pictures. ~ Susannah   “Pachinko” By Min Jin Lee An engrossing, emotional, and richly detailed story that spans both world wars. Follows four generations of Koreans on their journey and the struggles of surviving in exile from their homeland — it all feels painfully real. ~ Susannah   “Desert Solitaire” By Edward Abbey No other author I’ve found writes more eloquently about the

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: September 2017

    Sep 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Plainwater” By Anne Carson Both intimate and dazzling, my favorite essay from this collection is “Part V: The Anthropology of Water,” where Carson takes the reader on a pilgrimage in search of water. ~Lacey “Too Much and Not the Mood: Essays” By Durga Chew-Bose With intense lyricism, Chew-Bose ruminates on moments of her childhood and what it means to be a creative woman today. Both memoir and cultural criticism, “Too Much and Not the Mood” is poignant, philosophical, and deeply personal. ~Lacey “Sophie Calle: True Stories” By Sophie Calle As a writer, photographer, installation artist, and conceptual artist, Sophie Calle presents something unique, absorbing, and honest with “True Stories.” ~Lacey “My Dyslexia” By Phillip Schultz Required reading for anyone who has ever been made to feel broken or unimportant due to a learning disability. Schultz will revive your belief in the beauty and extraordinary intelligence that come thanks to, rather than in spite of, learning disabilities. ~Bekah “Catching the Big Fish” By David Lynch Yes, it’s a book by the film director David Lynch. Sparse and minimal, Lynch explores the creative process by homing in on the idea of sparking the fire from within. Surrealism and Transcendental Meditation collide! ~Joe “Summerlong” By Dean Bakopoulos A novel of surburban love both marital and extramarital. Tender, funny, and irresistible. ~Michaela “A Visit from the Goon Squad” By Jennifer

  • What’s in a name?: Heinrich Lyle debuts ‘Shameless Dick’

    Sep 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Heinrich Lyle, author of “Shameless Dick: Odyssey of a Cad.” Lyle has a book reading, time TBA Saturday, Sept. 16 at Peregrine Book Co., 219 N. Cortez St., 928-445-9000, PeregrineBookCompany.Com.] Why don’t you introduce yourself and your new book? I’m Heinrich Lyle, and I’ve lived in Arizona for about 11 years. Moved here from Los Angeles, where I was an actor, and I’m the author of “Shameless Dick: Odyssey of a Cad.” That project was really conceived years ago, when I was in college. It went through a few different incarnations. For a while, it was a musical play. I even wrote a few crazy songs for it. Then it was a straight narrative novel, but I stalled half way through it and shelved it for a couple of years. Then, one day, I was reading Dante’s “Inferno” and I kind of likened that story to my story: This is one man’s descent into his own hell, into purgatory. I also liked the terza rima style, those three-line stanzas, but I didn’t want to follow the rhyme pattern because I thought that’d be kind of tedious for the reader. I just liked that idea and aesthetic on the page. Once I had that, I worked out the whole thing and finished it in a

  • Peregrine Book Co.: July 2017

    Jun 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Wrenchies” By Farel Dalrymple Mr. Dalrymple does it all. Penciled, inked, watercolored, written, and lettered by the man himself. It is truly awesome. ~David “The Quiet American” By Graham Greene This melancholy classic, redolent with the damp heat and grenade-jarred grace of French-governed Saigon, raises more questions of responsibility, involvement, & guilt than seem possible in such a compact narrative. A disillusioned British journalist covering the progression of the Indochinese War befriends an intense, naive young American aid worker, and in spite of a studied determination not to “get involved” finds himself forced to do just that. ~Reva “Heart of Europe” By Peter H. Wilson Ever heard of a complete history of the Holy Roman Empire? No, you haven’t — luckily, here it is. Grab it for yourself or any history buff you have to entertain for a while. This book is dense and demanding but it includes absolutely everything. ~Veri “Beneath the Wheel” By Herman Hesse Being one of Hesse’s earliest works it differs vastly from favorites like “Steppenwolf.” However, it doesn’t in the least lack his brilliance and is an absolute must read for “Siddartha“ fans. ~Veri “Ancestor” By Matt Sheean and Malachi Ward Ancestor is an incredible sci-fi comic about a tech guru who sets out to put an end to problems that have long plagued humanity. The team of Sheean and

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: June 2017

    Jun 2, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Black Prism” By Brent Weeks I can’t remember ever reading a fantasy novel where I had such a difficult time determining who the good guys and bad guys really were. Brent Weeks completely rejects fantasy tropes like the flawless, handsome, inhumanly talented main hero; instead, we are given Kip, whose total incompetence shines like a fat, stupid beacon in a darkly unforgiving world. ~Sean “The Way of Natural History” By Thom Fleischner A window into one of the most important and least talked-about scientific fields, this book is an antidote for environmental despair. It reminds us that the natural world is wondrous and ever-present. ~Ty “Cry, Heart, But Never Break” By Glenn Ringtved & Charlotte Pardi “Some people say Death’s heart is as dead and black as a piece of coal, but that is not true. Beneath his inky cloak, Death’s heart is as red as the most beautiful sunset and beats with a great love of life.” This children’s book by a Danish author and illustrator team is a marvelously wise parable about death’s place in life. ~Reva “The Shining” By Stephen King Constantly teetering between reality and dreamland, this book will shake how you see the world around you — even with the lights on. ~Bekah “My Favorite Thing Is Monsters” By Emil Ferris This debut graphic novel about dark secrets and the

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: May 2017

    Apr 28, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Mistborn” By Brandon Sanderson A semi-heroic band of thieves plot to overthrow a god-king who has ruled uncontested for a thousand years. But can they really do any better? Not your standard average-Joe-vs-god fantasy story, this trilogy will leave many images and questions burning in your mind. ~Sean “Tribe” By Sebastian Junger What is it about modern affluent life that so starves us psychologically? How is it that wartime can provide the strongest social bonds and sense of meaning? Why do some survivors of extreme trauma develop PTSD, and others not? For succinct, powerful answers- read Tribe. I want to give it to all my friends. ~Reva “Bird Brains” By Candace Savage A photographic homage to corvids, that brilliant and gregarious family of birds whose members include jays, magpies, crows, and our own ravens. Full of fascinating natural history tidbits and anecdotes. Bird lovers will spend many a happy moment leafing through. ~Reva “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake” By Aimee Bender An honest and palpable representation of familial relationships verging on the supernatural. ~Bekah “The Stranger in the Woods” By Michael Finkel Christopher Knight lived in the Maine woods in a tent for 27 years. You read that correctly. Now get the book to find out how he did it! ~Jon “Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell” By Susanna Clarke An exceptionally funny and lighthearted story

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: April 2017

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Name of the Wind” By Patrick Rothfuss The best fantasy novel in decades, and the best introduction to the genre for any curious minds. The prose is nothing less than musical and the worldbuilding is seamless. This book stands up to dogged theorizing and dissection; there are stories under stories and secrets in the songs. Listen to Kvothe’s tale, but pay attention; things are not what they seem. ~Sean, Jon, & David “Here I Am” By Jonathan Safran Foer An astounding new novel from Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and Everything is Illuminated. Foer, again, is pushing the literary envelope in a stunning display of talent and heart. ~Jon “The Way Things Work Now” By David Macaulay No matter your age, interests, or feelings towards woolly mammoths, this book will entertain and teach. Just open it to any page and learn how stuff works. ~Sean “Plainwater” By Anne Carson Both intimate and dazzling, my favorite essay from this collection is Part V: The Anthropology of Water when Carson takes the reader on a pilgrimage in pursuit of water. ~Lacey “Pond” By Claire-Louise Bennett Pond is sharp and compassionate, beautiful and strange – and everything felt turned upside down and inside out after I read it. Claire-Louise Bennett inspires observation and self-awareness. ~Lacey “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” By Truman Capote So you’ve

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: March 2017

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Walking to Martha’s Vineyard” By Franz Wright Every word of this moving poetry collection is worth reading, more than once, while sipping tea (or whiskey), in front of the fireplace, while petting the cat. ~Jon “Every Time I Find the Meaning of Life, They Change It” By Daniel Klein This philosophy book is fun and easy to read. You read that right: fun and easy. Two words you wouldn’t normally use to describe a philosophy book. The author has made a craft of making philosophy something everyone can read, but it doesn’t take away from any of the big ideas throughout. ~Jon “High-Rise” By J. G. Ballard I dare you: read the first sentence, then try to look away. Ha ha haaa. Ballard’s psychological thriller is a diabolically perspicacious, riveting free-fall into absolute social collapse. ~Reva “The Devourers” By Indra Das Holy hell, is this book good. Das’ shapeshifter novel soars above its predecessors in both substance and style, a mesmerizing tale of were-predators and the twinned natures of humankind. The writing has real literary merit, mingling gruesomeness and beauty in ardent descriptive language. The concepts are original and convincing. I’m telling you, good stuff! ~Reva “Fortunately, the Milk” By Neil Gaiman This book has it all: A dinosaur, pirates, a volcano god, aliens, ponies, wumpires, and, fortunately, the milk. ~Veri “Perdido Street Station” By China

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: February 2017

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Three Moments of an Explosion” By China Miéville A collection of short stories, ranging from somewhat odd to completely absurd. The range of styles and moods expressed in Miéville’s work is impressive to say the least. For a quick taste, I’d recommend “The Rope Is The World” and “The Crawl.” ~Sean “And Then There Were None” By Agatha Christie Arguably the single best story penned by the most popular mystery author of all time. “And Then There Were None” is full of subtle guidance and misdirection; I challenge any reader who claims to have predicted the simply unpredictable conclusion of this timeless mystery. ~Sean “Based On A True Story” By Norm Macdonald At first glance, Macdonald’s book seems like the typical autobiography you’ve come to expect from a comedian. However, the brilliance of the novel is that it’s an “honest” work of fiction with bits of truth sprinkled in. ~Joe “Home” By Carson Ellis Beautiful illustrations. Wonderful storyline. Open it up and see! ~Jon “Into The Dark” By Mark Vieira Simply put: This book is packed with absolutely gorgeous black & white stills from the Noir era of crime films in the ’40s/’50s. My favorite book in the store. ~Joe “Despair” By Vladimir Nabokov A story of doubles and dopplegangers. Pay very close attention to each paragraph, sentence and word with this story because as soon

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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