Posts Tagged ‘Markoff Chaney’

  • Monsters: A patented approach

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney From the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, USPTO.Gov/terms-use-uspto-websites … Patent Information Patents are published as part of the terms of granting the patent to the inventor. Subject to limited exceptions reflected in 37 CFR 1.71(d) & (e) and 1.84(s), the text and drawings of a patent are typically not subject to copyright restrictions. The inventors’ rights to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States or importing the invention into the United States for a limited time is not compromised by the publication of the description of the invention. In other words, the fact that a patent’s description may have been published without copyright restrictions does not give you permission to manufacture or use the invention without permission from the inventor during the active life of the patent. See MPEP § 600 – 608.01(v) regarding the right to include a copyright or mask work notice in patents. ***** Markoff Chaney is an Earth-based whodunit pundit and (Fnord) Discordian Pope. He has lotsa bills and no sense. Contact him at NoisyNoiseIsNoisome@Gmail.Com

  • Toys: A patented approach

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, Something ElseNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney From the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, USPTO.Gov/terms-use-uspto-websites Patent Information Patents are published as part of the terms of granting the patent to the inventor. Subject to limited exceptions reflected in 37 CFR 1.71(d) & (e) and 1.84(s), the text and drawings of a patent are typically not subject to copyright restrictions. The inventors’ rights to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States or importing the invention into the United States for a limited time is not compromised by the publication of the description of the invention. In other words, the fact that a patent’s description may have been published without copyright restrictions does not give you permission to manufacture or use the invention without permission from the inventor during the active life of the patent. See MPEP § 600 – 608.01(v) regarding the right to include a copyright or mask work notice in patents.   US7488231B2, “Children’s toy with wireless tag/transponder,” Inventor: Denise Chapman Weston, Current assignee: MQ Gaming LLC, Original assignee: Creative Kingdoms LLC, Priority date: 2000-10-20 US6360693B1, “Animal toy,” Inventor: Ross Eugene Long III, Original assignee: Ross Eugene III, Priority date: 1999-12-02. US6887120B2, “Snappable toy with interchangeable portions,” Inventor: Joel B. Shamitoff, Original assignee: Joel B. Shamitoff, Priority date: 2001-08-14. US4673374A, “Articulated limb assembly for figure toy,” Inventor: William Kelley, Current assignee: Mattel Inc., Priority

  • There’s no time like the present … except for maybe 100 years ago, and maybe 50, too

    Dec 29, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney By now, you’re probably sick of holidays and those inevitable (and inevitably redundant and/or boring) “Year in Review” and “Top Stories of the Year” articles. Don’t pretend you’ve kept up with the papers. You’ve probably started the New Year with a stack of old news that would make the Collyer brothers balk. Instead of recapping recent events, let’s look toward the future … by looking back a century and half-century. Here’s a highly partial, by-no-means complete list of famous, infamous, or otherwise noteworthy 100-year and 50-year anniversaries to ponder in 2018. (And for Alert Readers, yes, this is a nearly identical intro to a similarly themed piece that’s run the past few years in 5enses. Was it any less effective?) 15 things that happened in 1918 • Jan. 8, 1918: Woodrow Wilson delivers his “Fourteen Points” speech outlining the principles of peace to be used for negotiations to end World War I. • January, 1918: Spanish flu, i.e. influenza (specifically H1N1), is observed in Kansas, kicking off the 1918 flu pandemic in the U.S. Worldwide, the influenza pandemic infects 500 million people resulting 50 million-100 million deaths, then three to five percent of the world’s population. In the U.S., alone, life expectancy dropped by a dozen years as a result. • Feb. 6, 1918: The “Representation of the People Act” gives most women over the age of

  • So real, Surreal: Slade Graves & (good) co. close an art show

    Sep 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney It starts with an image, “I am the Baby Jesus.” See it up there? That’s it. (Probably should’ve put a cutline somewhere; this’ll suffice.) Per the image, Slade Graves did that. It was the first image in what became a new body of work she’s showing this month at the Raven Café. “I am the Baby Jesus,” which is also the name of a draft chapter from an in-progress book by Michaela Carter. And, oh yeah, there’s an art opening — no, no, no, a closing! — and there’s going to be a reading, and poetry, and dancing, and I’ve waited far too long to mention Surrealism, which is a PART of this. Maybe I should just let Slade and her artistic director, Valerye Jeffries, explain. … ***** [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and artist Slade Graves and Valerye Jeffries, artistic director of Slade’s art closing. Slade’s art closing is after-hours, probably around 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 1, at the Raven Café, 142 N. Cortez St., 928-717-0009, RavenCafe.Com, $5 donation, bar operating, no food.] Where did the idea for this show come from? Graves: I think it started with us finding out about the Prescott Society for Surrealism, which was founded in 1939 by Hattie Safford. It was an entirely female branch of Surrealism that had little contact with the

  • 12 steps from Prescott: Prescott is your portal to … well, anything

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney It’s 2 a.m. and you’re reading a Wikipedia entry entitled “List of people who have declined a British honour.” Wait — how’d you get here? Weren’t you looking for info about how telescopes work? And what’s Sir Alfred Hitchcock doing on a list of people who’ve rejected the title?! As someone or other once said, “everything’s connected … especially on Wikipedia.” There’s a (practically) endless source of (partially vetted, mostly true) information just a few swipes and/or clicks away. But where to begin? How about at home, right here in Prescott. Using the Wikipedia article on “Prescott, Arizona” as your starting point, you can take a tour of tangentially related art, science, history, philosophy, economics, and even the film career of Christopher Lee. Tribes, plants, & seaman 1. Yavapai-Prescott Tribe 2. Indian Reorganization Act 3. John Collier 4. John Collier Jr. 5. San Francisco Art Institute 6. Dogpatch, San Francisco 7. Dogfennel (links to Anthemis) 8. Cultivar 9. Plant Breeders 10. Genetically Modified Food Controversies 11. Greenpeace 12. Sailormongering History, slurs, & fast food economics 1. Arizona Territory 2. Gadsden Purchase 3. Franklin Pierce 4. Historical rankings of presidents of the United States 5. James Buchanan 6. Doughface 7. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. 8. Imperial presidency 9. Economic globalization 10. Cultural globalization 11. Big Mac Index 12. KFC Index Pros, prose, & political advisors 1. Red-light district

  • There’s no time like the present … except for maybe 1917

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney By now, you’re probably sick of holidays and those inevitable (and inevitably redundant and/or boring) “Year in Review” and “Top Stories of the Year” articles. Don’t pretend you’ve kept up with the papers. You’ve probably started the New Year with a stack of old news that would make the Collyer brothers balk. Instead of recapping recent events, let’s look toward the future … by looking back a century. Here’s a highly partial, by-no-means complete list of famous, infamous, or otherwise noteworthy 100-year anniversaries to ponder in 2017. (And for Alert Readers, yes, this is a nearly identical intro to a similarly themed piece for the January 2015 and January 2016 issues of 5enses. Was it any less effective?)   ***** January, 1917 • J.R.R. Tolkien begins writing “The Book of Lost Tales,” the first draft of what later becomes “The Silmarillion.” January 10, 1917 • William F. Cody (“Buffalo Bill”) dies. (Was born in 1846.) March 2, 1917 • The enactment of the Jones Act grants Puerto Ricans U.S. citizenship. March 4, 1917 • Jeannette Rankin, of Montana, becomes the first woman member of the U.S. House of Representatives. March 7, 1917 • “Livery Stable Blues,” recorded by the Original Dixieland Jass Band, becomes the first commercially released jazz recording. April 1, 1917 • Scott Joplin, ragtime pianist, dies. (Was born in 1867 or 1868.) April 14,

  • En route: Amusing finds from an unamusing profession

    Sep 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney It’s happened 46 times. Usually at night. Once a month, for the last 46 months, I’ve trolled Prescott, Prescott Valley, Chino Valley, and Dewey-Humboldt delivering newspapers. Even went out Mayer-way twice. Newspaper delivery is boring. Absolutely necessary, but absolutely boring. And — despite some amusing podcasts and rambling conversations with friends brave/bored enough to tag along — most of those nights blur together. Some things stick out, though. Especially when you step on them. And I mean things. For your consideration, here are a few of the things I’ve found while out and about the enigmatic Quad Cities. … ***** • Thor’s hammer An accessory for a kid’s toy, only really heavy and detailed. OK, so an accessory for an adult’s toy. • Shopping lists They’re ubiquitous, and not just near grocery stores. Most of them were jotted in pen on paper. (Editor’s Note: Cooking is an art, so is a grocery list considered an artistic creation? That would mean it should be “is” not “were” in the second sentence of this bullet per the rules about the literary present tense.) A trio of memorable items: “funeral card for mom,” “bear,” and “one package flower [sic].” • A miniature American flag These are quite common in July, but this one was found in December or January last year. • Plywood with a tiger print Special thanks to

  • Ray Gunned: Markoff Chaney pays homage to David Carson

    Apr 1, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Feature17 CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney [Editor’s Note: Font-dependent satire works better on paper. If you’re curious and can’t get a hold of a copy of the 2016-04 issue of 5enses, check it out via our uploads at ISSUU.] ***** Markoff Chaney is an Earth-based whodunit pundit and (Fnord) Discordian Pope. He has lotsa bills and no sense. Contact him at NoisyNoiseIsNoisome@Gmail.Com

  • … finish each other’s sentences: Google’s autocomplete is …

    Feb 5, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney I don’t mean to brag or anything, but I have the Internet at home. Not the whole thing, obviously, but I can check on it anytime I want via the same computer I’m typing at right now. Pretty nifty, huh? Anyway, I just found out about this amazing digital oracle called Google (who names these things?) and, apparently, it knows what I’m going to research or “search” for before I finish typing it. Here are some recent highlights. …     ***** Markoff Chaney is an Earth-based whodunit pundit and (Fnord) Discordian Pope. He has lotsa bills and no sense. Contact him at NoisyNoiseIsNoisome@Gmail.Com

  • There’s no time like the present: … except for maybe 1916, or maybe 1966

    Jan 1, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney By now, you’re probably sick of holidays and those inevitable (and inevitably redundant and/or boring) “Year in Review” and “Top Stories of the Year” articles. Don’t pretend you’ve kept up with the papers. You’ve probably started the New Year with a stack of old news that would make the Collyer brothers balk. Instead of recapping recent events, let’s look toward the future … by looking back a century. Here’s a highly partial, by-no-means complete list of famous, infamous, or otherwise noteworthy 100-year anniversaries to ponder in 2016. (And for alert readers, yes, this is a nearly identical intro to a similarly themed piece for the January 2015 of 5enses. Was it any less effective?)   Jan. 24, 1916 • In Browning, Montana, the temperature drops from 44 F to -56 F in one day, the greatest change ever on record for a 24-hour period in the U.S. and world at large. Feb. 9, 1916 • At 6 p.m., a monocle-clad Tristan Tzara enters the Cabaret Voltaire stage singing sentimental melodies and handing paper wads to “scandalized spectators,” yielding the stage to masked actors on stilts, returning in clown attire thus founding the Dadaism art movement, according to Hans Arp. Feb. 28, 1916 • American expat and novelist Henry James dies of a stroke at age 72. March 7, 1916 • In Munich, Germany Die Bayerischen Motoren Werke

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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