Posts Tagged ‘Lacey’

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: September 2017

    Sep 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Plainwater” By Anne Carson Both intimate and dazzling, my favorite essay from this collection is “Part V: The Anthropology of Water,” where Carson takes the reader on a pilgrimage in search of water. ~Lacey “Too Much and Not the Mood: Essays” By Durga Chew-Bose With intense lyricism, Chew-Bose ruminates on moments of her childhood and what it means to be a creative woman today. Both memoir and cultural criticism, “Too Much and Not the Mood” is poignant, philosophical, and deeply personal. ~Lacey “Sophie Calle: True Stories” By Sophie Calle As a writer, photographer, installation artist, and conceptual artist, Sophie Calle presents something unique, absorbing, and honest with “True Stories.” ~Lacey “My Dyslexia” By Phillip Schultz Required reading for anyone who has ever been made to feel broken or unimportant due to a learning disability. Schultz will revive your belief in the beauty and extraordinary intelligence that come thanks to, rather than in spite of, learning disabilities. ~Bekah “Catching the Big Fish” By David Lynch Yes, it’s a book by the film director David Lynch. Sparse and minimal, Lynch explores the creative process by homing in on the idea of sparking the fire from within. Surrealism and Transcendental Meditation collide! ~Joe “Summerlong” By Dean Bakopoulos A novel of surburban love both marital and extramarital. Tender, funny, and irresistible. ~Michaela “A Visit from the Goon Squad” By Jennifer

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: August 2017

    Jul 25, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Annihilation” By Jeff Vandermeer This short novel has such a thick, ominous sense of atmosphere that it almost creeps off the pages in a musky fog. A little bit of Bradbury, a little more of Lovecraft, and a lot of something new that evades comparison. ~Sean “Seven Brief Lessons on Physics” By Carlo Rovelli Direct and elegant. Gain a better understanding of the fundamental laws that govern our universe. Maybe if you memorize them you’ll get special powers or something. ~Sean “Legacy of Ashes” By Tim Weiner This book is a comprehensive chronicle of the achievements and foibles of the CIA since its origin as the OSS in the early 21st century. ~Joe “Complete Stories” By Clarice Lispector Lispector writes in a way that allows you to feel as if you know her characters intimately, to comfortably exist in the space she has created for them, and to feel every emotion and thought they have, in just a few short lines. Feelings that only intensify as you continue to read. ~Lacey “Speedboat” By Renata Adler Adler forces you to look at your surroundings with new eyes, question those seemingly insignificant meetings with strangers, and explore your curiosity as she grants glimpses into the special oddities of her life. Adler disregards the rules of the novel with unexpected ease as she takes you on a journey through

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: May 2017

    Apr 28, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Mistborn” By Brandon Sanderson A semi-heroic band of thieves plot to overthrow a god-king who has ruled uncontested for a thousand years. But can they really do any better? Not your standard average-Joe-vs-god fantasy story, this trilogy will leave many images and questions burning in your mind. ~Sean “Tribe” By Sebastian Junger What is it about modern affluent life that so starves us psychologically? How is it that wartime can provide the strongest social bonds and sense of meaning? Why do some survivors of extreme trauma develop PTSD, and others not? For succinct, powerful answers- read Tribe. I want to give it to all my friends. ~Reva “Bird Brains” By Candace Savage A photographic homage to corvids, that brilliant and gregarious family of birds whose members include jays, magpies, crows, and our own ravens. Full of fascinating natural history tidbits and anecdotes. Bird lovers will spend many a happy moment leafing through. ~Reva “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake” By Aimee Bender An honest and palpable representation of familial relationships verging on the supernatural. ~Bekah “The Stranger in the Woods” By Michael Finkel Christopher Knight lived in the Maine woods in a tent for 27 years. You read that correctly. Now get the book to find out how he did it! ~Jon “Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell” By Susanna Clarke An exceptionally funny and lighthearted story

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: April 2017

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Name of the Wind” By Patrick Rothfuss The best fantasy novel in decades, and the best introduction to the genre for any curious minds. The prose is nothing less than musical and the worldbuilding is seamless. This book stands up to dogged theorizing and dissection; there are stories under stories and secrets in the songs. Listen to Kvothe’s tale, but pay attention; things are not what they seem. ~Sean, Jon, & David “Here I Am” By Jonathan Safran Foer An astounding new novel from Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and Everything is Illuminated. Foer, again, is pushing the literary envelope in a stunning display of talent and heart. ~Jon “The Way Things Work Now” By David Macaulay No matter your age, interests, or feelings towards woolly mammoths, this book will entertain and teach. Just open it to any page and learn how stuff works. ~Sean “Plainwater” By Anne Carson Both intimate and dazzling, my favorite essay from this collection is Part V: The Anthropology of Water when Carson takes the reader on a pilgrimage in pursuit of water. ~Lacey “Pond” By Claire-Louise Bennett Pond is sharp and compassionate, beautiful and strange – and everything felt turned upside down and inside out after I read it. Claire-Louise Bennett inspires observation and self-awareness. ~Lacey “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” By Truman Capote So you’ve

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: October 2016

    Sep 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Captain Asks for a Show of Hands” By Nick Flynn The subject matter in this particular collection is a lucid encounter with a dreamer. Nick Flynn’s ability to hook you with but a few words is a skill few possess. Sit back and slowly read the beautifully sparse poems and you’ll say to yourself, Well, gosh golly, he may be onto something. ~Jon “Lives in Ruins” By Marilyn Johnson Although archaeologists love Indiana Jones (they really do) their lives couldn’t be more different from his. So who are the wild and quirky characters on their hands and knees digging and sifting through the dirt looking for ruins? The ones who live in their cars because being an archeologist doesn’t pay well? Johnson’s curiosity takes her on a journey to answer these questions. Digging alongside experts with her on a sugar plantation, hunting bodies in New Jersey, and drinking ancient beverages, we discover the incredible men and women unearthing the objects of our past. It was hard to finish this, only because I didn’t want to say goodbye to all the incredible people I had been reading about. ~Lacey “The Butterflies of North America” By Titian Peale This reproduction of Titian Peale’s lost manuscript is exquisite. The paintings are phenomenal. The pages are printed on extremely high quality paper, and the book smells of a dank

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: August 2016

    Aug 5, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Zeitoun” By Dave Eggers Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath caused so many people pain and destruction. This account of one family’s experience reveals the beauty and tenacity of New Orleans while also exposing a few massive policy disasters. — Emma “Sexus” By Henry Miller Henry Miller is pretty well known for having books banned in the USA. Although this book is definitely pushing limits in detailed eroticism, the bottom line is that Henry Miller was an incredibly gifted writer. This fictionalized retelling of the beginning of his second marriage is incredible. If my defense of Henry Miller is meek, his own may serve better: “I can never go back on what I’ve written. If it was not good, it was true; if it was not artistic, it was sincere; if it was in bad taste, it was on the side of life.” — David “Into Thin Air” By Jon Krakauer A haunting account of one of the deadliest treks in Everest’s history. Jon Krakauer describes the beauty and terror of mountaineering in a way that will either make you long for its glory or run screaming in the other direction (which is downhill, by the way). This book is easy to read, but hard to digest. — Sean “Sergio Y.” By Alexandre Vidal Porto This short novel is a brief view into the life of a

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: July 2016

    Jul 1, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “On Inequality” By Harry Frankfurt On average, women make about 78 cents to every dollar a man makes. Same jobs, same duties. Is this right? Of course it isn’t. But is equal pay the right way to go? Is this where we should start? If men and women make roughly the same amount but neither make enough to stay above the poverty line, does it even matter? Read on to see what the book has to say on this relevant topic. — Jon “The Picture of Dorian Gray” By Oscar Wilde Pictures have the ability to capture moments, people, and places as timeless memories. However, what would happen if such captivation was used incorrectly or even maliciously? This book is haunting and thought-provoking and has stayed with me for many years. — Emma “Beauty is a Wound” By Eka Kurniawan This Indonesian novel knocked my socks off. Eka Kurniawan carries the mantle of magical realism beautifully here. If you are a fan of Borges, Garcia Marquez, Murakami, or Rushdie this book will fit nicely in your collection. It reads smoother to me than all the aforementioned, and is the best book I’ve read so far this year. — David “All Tomorrow’s Parties” By Rob Spillman With incredible clarity, Spillman looks back on being an only child of divorced parents, the eccentric life he led with his

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: April 2016

    Apr 1, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “As You Wish” By Cary Elwes There’s a shortage of perfect behind-the-scenes memoirs in the world. It would be a (very great) pity to let this one pass you by. I literally wept with laughter. — Reva “Wizard’s First Rule” By Terry Goodkind The first book in one of the greatest fantasy series ever conceived, “Wizard’s First Rule” is the story of a woodsman who suddenly finds himself called to overthrow a god-king and save a continent (and that’s just book 1 of 11). Goodkind’s work strikes an elusive balance between philosophy, humor, and character-oriented worldbuilding that surpasses all but the best of the genre; a must-read for any fan of epic fantasy. — Sean “The Mare” By Mary Gaitskill In her latest novel, her first in 10 years, Gaitskill writes in her distinctive, lyrical style about a Dominican girl, the Anglo woman who introduces her to riding, and the horse who changes everything. A raw and candid coming-of-age story, “The Mare” is one of the most powerful books I’ve read in a while! — Michaela “The Man Who Planted Trees” By Jim Robbins There is still much to learn about the abilities of trees. How do they die? Communicate? Protect themselves and other trees? Robbins writes about an average man, David Milarch, whose extraordinary mission is to clone the largest, oldest, and most resilient trees

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: March 2016

    Mar 4, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Clapton” By Eric Clapton An autobiography that provides amazing insights into the lives of rock heroes of the ’60s and ’70s, all told firsthand from Slowhand himself. This is the story of the last living guitar god and the people who helped him become a legend. — Sean “Crow Planet” By Lynda Lynn Haupt Crows — whether you love or hate them, we must agree that these black beauties are brilliant. From dropping nuts in the road to be cracked by cars to playing in the snow, crows have certainly adapted to urban life while still remaining wild. Haupt connects crows’ adaptations with our own. As someone with an unquenchable thirst for wilderness, I love Haupt’s message that urban settings still offer us a sense of wildness we musn’t overlook. Crows certainly haven’t. — Emma “Instant: The Story of Polaroid” By Christopher Bonanos The biography of instant film and its founder Edwin Land. This book takes you on a photo tour of once state of the art technology that is now state of the art nostalgia. This was the closest we had to instant gratification prior to the digital era. Venture back to the ’50s and see how it all began. You may just find yourself considering that thrift store Polaroid next time you see it. — David “The Rosie Project” By Graeme Simsion Imagine Dr

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: February 2016

    Feb 5, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “M Train” By Patti Smith Composed of experiences and various adventures, this is an incredibly beautiful story of love, loss, and what can be found. In “M Train” you will discover Smith’s wit and undeniable strength as she faces life without her love Fred “Sonic” Smith and how she finds peace through grief. A very personal look into Smith’s life, this book is just as special, if not more so, than her first novel Just Kids. — Lacey “The Vorrh” By Brian Catling If you love fantasy you must read this — however, if you don’t, this is your chance. This novel gave me the chills. — Veri “Ms. Marvel: No Normal” By G. Willow Wilson & Adrian Alphona Don’t know what on earth the appeal of comics is? Curious, but turned off by the thought of scanty spandex, scantier plot lines and extreme graphic violence? Never fear: Ms. Marvel is here! This is exactly the kind of surprising, loyalty-inspiring comic that’s driving the genre’s renaissance. Starring Kamala Khan, a Jersey City teen who grapples with her newfound superpowers and villains alike as she tries to reconcile crime-fighting with a 9 p.m. curfew, and featuring stellar writing (who doesn’t love a superhero costume made out of a burkini?), wildly funny art, and a big heart, Ms. Marvel is a winner. — Reva “Aviary Wonders Inc.” By

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