Posts Tagged ‘Jon’

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: July 2018

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Investigations of a Dog” by Franz Kafka Full of labyrinthine hiding places, walking nightmares, and absurd humor. ~Lacey “The Dream and the Underworld” by James Hillman A case could be made that a book like this could only be alluring to academics or the intellectual crowd. However, I think it bridges a gap between the casual reader and the scholarly when it comes to delving deep into the realm of darkness and dreams. ~Joe “Varina” by Charles Frazier A captivating and transportive new tale of the Civil War from the author of “Cold Mountain.” Fans of Frazier will not be disappointed. As for newcomers, prepare to be bewitched. ~Bekah “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats” by T. S. Eliot Ever wonder what the musical “Cats” was based on? T. S. Eliot’s light-hearted departure from his more serious works (Prufrock, anyone?) is a series of fun cat-themed poems well worth a lazy hour with a feline companion on your lap. ~Susannah “The Honey Farm” by Harriet Alida Lye Not a summer goes by when the bees are not … doing what they do. The same could be said about humans, right? There’s a correlation there, for sure, in this twisty psychological drama about trouble on a bee farm during one hot, dry summer. ~Jon “An Apology for Idlers” by Robert Louis Stevenson This slim jewel of a

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: May 2018

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Small Homes Grand Living” by Gestalten Press Are you one of those people who derives furtive yet intense pleasure from leafing through photobooks of soothing minimalist design and modern small spaces? Your secret’s safe with me. Take a peek at this one and sigh a happy sigh. ~Reva “Pocket Atlas of Remote Islands” by Judith Schalansky What a queer little book. Subtitled “Fifty Islands I Have Not Visited and Never Will,” this pocket-sized yellow volume feels like a relic from a bygone age of exploration, speculation, and mystery. ~Reva “Meeting the Shadow” edited by Connie Zweig and Jeremiah Abrams This is a collection of scholarly essays exploring the darker depths of the human psyche. Themes range as widely as Life, Death, Sex, and even Work. It’s an excellent source for understanding one’s own shadow self, and broaches the age-old question: “What are we hiding?” ~Joe “The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon” by Stephen King A terrifyingly accurate though moving depiction of childhood and the innately human fear of the dark. ~Bekah “The House on Mango Street” by Sandra Cisneros A series of short vignettes gives soaring voice to a multitude of characters whose stories would otherwise be left unheard. “The House on Mango Street” stands out with simple yet awe-inspiring writing with a powerful message duly delivered. ~Susannah “Golden Hill” by Francis Spafford Spafford’s witty and

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: April 2018

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “How to Build a Girl,” by Caitlin Moran Sincere to the point of (hilarious) obscenity. A sweet-and-sour story about growing up and the ultimately brutal reality of what it means to be a woman. ~Bekah “The Child Finder,” by Rene Denfield Shining light in the darkest of places, “The Child Finder” is a terrifying, beautiful book. I couldn’t put it down. ~Michaela “Bad Feminist,” by Roxane Gay Reading this book is like hanging out with your best friend. Brilliant, honest, and hilarious. ~Michaela “City on Fire,” by Garth Risk Hallberg This novel, Hallberg’s first, is stellar. I marveled at the beauty of his sentences, fell in love with his characters, and didn’t want it to end. ~Michaela “Nadja,” by André Breton The author of “The Surrealist Manifesto” forays into fiction. He uses Dadaist and Surrealist techniques in an interesting juxtaposition of images and words that strongly influenced the “illustrated novel” of today. ~Joe “Binti,” by Nnedi Okorafor This story is heartwarming in the most surreal way possible. From the first paragraph I was swept into an absolutely alien, but still somehow comprehensible world. And from there I traveled with Binti — I was afraid of Binti — and eventually, I found peace with Binti. ~Jon “The Pelican Tree,” by Marnie Devereux Local author Devereux is back with her second book of poetry. Her sincerity is refreshing,

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: February 2018

    Feb 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Greatest Story Ever Told — So Far,” by Lawrence Krauss This gem by famous physicist and Arizona resident Krauss is easy and fun to read. I guarantee you’ll learn something — but I promise it won’t hurt! ~Jon “Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth,” by Frank Cottrell Boyce Prez, a silent boy from the Children’s Temporary foster home, meets Sputnik, an alien disguised as a dog, in this touching book for young readers. Sputnik and Prez embark on a mission to save the Earth that has a lot in common with “The Hithchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.” It’s just as funny while also dealing with some very difficult topics. ~Veri “Stages of Rot,” by Linnea Sterte This is a beautiful limited edition of Swedish artist Linnea Sterte’s debut graphic novel. Her illustrative skill is unique. This lyrical exploration of what happens to the underwater carcass of a whale belongs in the hands of any art lover or true sequential art enthusiast. ~David “Transformations,” by Anne Sexton A modern take on the Brothers Grimm though poetry; dark and twisted. ~Lacey “Women & Power,” by Mary Beard The brilliant, hilarious, charismatic Mary Beard, a Cambridge professor and scholar of the Classical world, tackles the thorny relationship between women and Western cultural structures of power in this brief and potent new book. Like a glass of really good

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: December 2017

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Architecture on the Carpet” By Brenda & Robert Vale This is definitely not a book for everyone because it’s focused on a single subject. However, to this reader, it’s absolutely fascinating to see the comparison between the birth of construction toys and modern architecture. ~Joe “Weird Love” By Clizia Gussoni & Craig Yoe It’s difficult to describe why I found myself drawn to the point of obsession with this series of comics. They read like strange soap operas from the 1950s. It’s absurd kitsch. I guess they just feel like home to me. ~Joe Mystifyingly absorbing and entertaining vignettes of some truly weird loves indeed. I’ve had many an incredulous laugh over these satisfyingly pulpy bits. ~Reva “The White Road” By Edmund de Waal A thorough examination of porcelain’s long history, beauty, and how it has enchanted cultures for years. ~Lacey “Coming to my Senses” By Alice Waters With language that is straightforward and simple, it doesn’t take long to realize Alice Waters is sharp, witty, and brave. ~Lacey “Down and Out in Paris and London” By George Orwell With rebellious clarity, Orwell’s reflections on the reality of extreme poverty in Paris and London are both sobering and graphic. ~Lacey “The Book of the Cat” By Angus Hyland Famous artists show some love for our furry friends. My new favorite book. ~Susannah Exquisite, witty, reverent renderings

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: November 2017

    Nov 3, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Second Sex” By Simone de Beauvoir Along with “The Feminine Mystique,” de Beauvoir’s “The Second Sex” is one of the quintessential tomes on mid-century women’s liberation. ~ Lacey   “The Book of Emma Reyes” By Emma Reyes Reading “The Book of Emma Reyes” is like holding the key to a secret door. An incredible story of self-discovery, resilience, and courage. ~ Lacey   “In the Cafe of Lost Youth” By Patrick Modiano Master of the hauntingly beautiful, Modiano weaves a world you won’t want to leave. Skillfully layered with the themes of emotion, identity, and human behavior. ~ Lacey   “The Trial” By Franz Kafka Waking up to being accused of a crime and not being told what it is, to supposedly being under arrest but not apprehended and taken to jail, is an odd way to start the day. ~ Joe   “Sanctuary” By William Faulkner This is my favorite in Faulkner’s oeuvre. Part Southern Gothic, part noir, and strangely elegant. Sanctuary is the book to read on a late summer night. ~ Joe   “The Boys from Brazil” By Ira Levin A Nazi hunter plays detective, searching for Josef Mengele, who is rumored to be in South America concocting a frightening experiment. (As absurd as it sounds, this book is a thrilling page turner). ~ Joe   “Finnegans Wake” By James Joyce The

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: August 2017

    Jul 25, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Annihilation” By Jeff Vandermeer This short novel has such a thick, ominous sense of atmosphere that it almost creeps off the pages in a musky fog. A little bit of Bradbury, a little more of Lovecraft, and a lot of something new that evades comparison. ~Sean “Seven Brief Lessons on Physics” By Carlo Rovelli Direct and elegant. Gain a better understanding of the fundamental laws that govern our universe. Maybe if you memorize them you’ll get special powers or something. ~Sean “Legacy of Ashes” By Tim Weiner This book is a comprehensive chronicle of the achievements and foibles of the CIA since its origin as the OSS in the early 21st century. ~Joe “Complete Stories” By Clarice Lispector Lispector writes in a way that allows you to feel as if you know her characters intimately, to comfortably exist in the space she has created for them, and to feel every emotion and thought they have, in just a few short lines. Feelings that only intensify as you continue to read. ~Lacey “Speedboat” By Renata Adler Adler forces you to look at your surroundings with new eyes, question those seemingly insignificant meetings with strangers, and explore your curiosity as she grants glimpses into the special oddities of her life. Adler disregards the rules of the novel with unexpected ease as she takes you on a journey through

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: May 2017

    Apr 28, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Mistborn” By Brandon Sanderson A semi-heroic band of thieves plot to overthrow a god-king who has ruled uncontested for a thousand years. But can they really do any better? Not your standard average-Joe-vs-god fantasy story, this trilogy will leave many images and questions burning in your mind. ~Sean “Tribe” By Sebastian Junger What is it about modern affluent life that so starves us psychologically? How is it that wartime can provide the strongest social bonds and sense of meaning? Why do some survivors of extreme trauma develop PTSD, and others not? For succinct, powerful answers- read Tribe. I want to give it to all my friends. ~Reva “Bird Brains” By Candace Savage A photographic homage to corvids, that brilliant and gregarious family of birds whose members include jays, magpies, crows, and our own ravens. Full of fascinating natural history tidbits and anecdotes. Bird lovers will spend many a happy moment leafing through. ~Reva “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake” By Aimee Bender An honest and palpable representation of familial relationships verging on the supernatural. ~Bekah “The Stranger in the Woods” By Michael Finkel Christopher Knight lived in the Maine woods in a tent for 27 years. You read that correctly. Now get the book to find out how he did it! ~Jon “Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell” By Susanna Clarke An exceptionally funny and lighthearted story

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: April 2017

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “The Name of the Wind” By Patrick Rothfuss The best fantasy novel in decades, and the best introduction to the genre for any curious minds. The prose is nothing less than musical and the worldbuilding is seamless. This book stands up to dogged theorizing and dissection; there are stories under stories and secrets in the songs. Listen to Kvothe’s tale, but pay attention; things are not what they seem. ~Sean, Jon, & David “Here I Am” By Jonathan Safran Foer An astounding new novel from Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and Everything is Illuminated. Foer, again, is pushing the literary envelope in a stunning display of talent and heart. ~Jon “The Way Things Work Now” By David Macaulay No matter your age, interests, or feelings towards woolly mammoths, this book will entertain and teach. Just open it to any page and learn how stuff works. ~Sean “Plainwater” By Anne Carson Both intimate and dazzling, my favorite essay from this collection is Part V: The Anthropology of Water when Carson takes the reader on a pilgrimage in pursuit of water. ~Lacey “Pond” By Claire-Louise Bennett Pond is sharp and compassionate, beautiful and strange – and everything felt turned upside down and inside out after I read it. Claire-Louise Bennett inspires observation and self-awareness. ~Lacey “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” By Truman Capote So you’ve

  • Peregrine Book Co. Staff Picks: March 2017

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Peregrine Book Co. Staff PicksNo CommentsRead More »

    Catered by Reva Sherrard “Walking to Martha’s Vineyard” By Franz Wright Every word of this moving poetry collection is worth reading, more than once, while sipping tea (or whiskey), in front of the fireplace, while petting the cat. ~Jon “Every Time I Find the Meaning of Life, They Change It” By Daniel Klein This philosophy book is fun and easy to read. You read that right: fun and easy. Two words you wouldn’t normally use to describe a philosophy book. The author has made a craft of making philosophy something everyone can read, but it doesn’t take away from any of the big ideas throughout. ~Jon “High-Rise” By J. G. Ballard I dare you: read the first sentence, then try to look away. Ha ha haaa. Ballard’s psychological thriller is a diabolically perspicacious, riveting free-fall into absolute social collapse. ~Reva “The Devourers” By Indra Das Holy hell, is this book good. Das’ shapeshifter novel soars above its predecessors in both substance and style, a mesmerizing tale of were-predators and the twinned natures of humankind. The writing has real literary merit, mingling gruesomeness and beauty in ardent descriptive language. The concepts are original and convincing. I’m telling you, good stuff! ~Reva “Fortunately, the Milk” By Neil Gaiman This book has it all: A dinosaur, pirates, a volcano god, aliens, ponies, wumpires, and, fortunately, the milk. ~Veri “Perdido Street Station” By China

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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