Posts Tagged ‘James Dungeon’

  • Going Places: Prescott Area Artist Studio Tour returns

    Aug 31, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Cindi Shaffer, participating artist and executive member of the Prescott Area Artist Studio Tour, and Johanna Shipley, first-time participating artist on the tour. The 11th Prescott Area Artist Studio Tour is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday through Sunday, Oct. 5-7. The opening gala is 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 3 at the Elks Theatre & Performing Arts Center, 117 E. Gurley St. Visit PrescottStudioTour.Com for a complete list of participants and more.] Cindy Shaffer, Astral Glass Studio, 697 Sixth St. Suite 106, AstralGlassStudio.Com, AstralGlassStudio@Gmail.Com. What is the Prescott Area Artist Studio Tour and how does it work? You visit artists in their studios and actually get to see how they work. With my own medium, people often don’t understand that I start off with sheets of glass and stack them and fire the piece multiple times. The studio tour allows you a different way of looking at mediums and interacting with artists and finding out more about what you’re looking at. A lot of us do demos, and that education piece is a big part of this. … I think the more the public realizes how much time you put into the process, the more people appreciate the final result. Also, the demos help expose the kids and the big kids to more parts of the

  • Meeting of minds, cultures: Prescott Powwow returns to Watson Lake

    Aug 31, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Manuel Lucero IV, chairman of the Prescott Powwow, of the Cherokee Nation. The Prescott Powwow is Sept. 21-23 at Watson Lake Park, 3101 Watson Lake Park Road. Find out more at PrescottPowwow.Org.] What is the Prescott Powwow? A powwow is a gathering of native people. Most powwows, these days, are inter-tribal powwows with people coming from all over the continent to dance and pray and trade. These have been going on for hundreds of years. It’s usually in the summertime. It’s a time to see old friends, make new friends, meet relatives you never knew you had, trade, and, some times, marriages come out of the meetings. It’s about sharing with other people, about having a good time. We’ve been doing the Prescott Powwow for 12 years. Unlike some other powwows or social gatherings you may go to, there are no contests or money to be made. People come to our powwow because they love to do it. … The powwow usually starts with the grand entry, which is like a parade with all of the dancers from all over the different regions of this continent, which we call Turtle Island, which is North America. It goes into dance demonstrations of different styles from different regions, and from there, there are social dances as

  • True as steel: The art of Natalie Krol

    Aug 3, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Natalie Krol. See more of Krol’s art at NatalieKrol.Com.] Were you into art as a kid? I took a journalism class in junior high school, and that’s where I learned I loved expressing myself through prose. Poetry, though, became my favorite. I wrote a lot of poetry and tackled all the “why” questions. Why is there war in the world? Why are people unhappy? That’s big stuff to get into, right? And it was great fun. … When I moved into high school I got into literature. When I got married, I wanted a career that would let me stay home with my kids, so I started writing children’s stories. I remember one about a little cloud that talked to children about how the rain came. I decided one day that I would illustrate my stories. I’d met a gal who’d taken classes at the Chicago Art Institute, and I asked her to teach me to illustrate. I was about 21 at the time. I had one baby and another one in the basket. So, I went to her home and took eight lessons. Realizing I knew about as much as she did about art, I decided, hey, I’m going to art school, and I fell madly in love with the art world.

  • Simmyology: Why Not? Bellydance returns with ‘Beat the Heat’

    Aug 3, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Lisa Hendrickson of Why Not? Bellydance. The troupe’s annual free “Beat the Heat” public performance is 7-9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25 at the Holiday Courtyard, 150 Montezuma St., on Whiskey Row. Workshops are held Saturday at the Holiday Courtyard and Elk’s Theatre. Register for $10 plus $5 for each class at WhyNotBellydance.Com. Workshop space is limited and first come, first served.] What is “Beat the Heat”? It’s a weekend devoted to bellydance workshops and a public performance. This August will be the third year we’ve done it. The basic idea is to bring together different bellydance troupes throughout the state of Arizona so we can just connect and learn different movements and watch each other perform. The workshops are open to dancers, even those who’ve never done bellydance before. They take place throughout the day Saturday in the Holiday Courtyard and at the Elks, then, at night, we have the public performance. That’s so we can enjoy each other’s performances and expose the public, at large, to bellydance. That part is always free and open to the public. That public part of this — what are some of the misconceptions surrounding bellydance? Sometimes there’s a notion around bellydance that it’s very cabaret like, just a solo artist who’s dancing and often there are glittery

  • On the Rocks: Take a tour of the Prescott Gem & Mineral Show

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Maggi Lieber, co-chairman, life member, and newsletter writer for the Prescott Gem & Mineral Club. The club’s 15th annual Prescott Gem & Mineral Show is 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 3 & 4 & 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 5 at Prescott Valley Event Center, 3201 N. Main St. , $4-$5, children under 12 free with paid adult. Find out more at PrescottGemMineral.Org.]   What exactly is the Prescott Gem & Mineral Show and what can you tell us about the vendors? This is our 15th annual show and sale. There’ll be more than 60 vendors selling a variety of things, all lapidary-, rock-, gem-, mineral-, and jewelry-related. Some of the vendors are members of the Prescott Gem & Mineral Club, others come from Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado. We even have one coming up from Texas. They’re mostly coming from all over the Southwest. We have an approximate 80 percent return rate on vendors. It’s a good indoor show, climate control, and you don’t have to worry about the wind blowing away the wares — not that rocks wound blow away, mind you. To make sure we have quality vendors, they have to have at least 80 percent rock-/mineral-/gem-related materials.   The event seems to cater to rock hounds and jewelry people alike. What’s

  • Eye of the needle: Northern Arizona Tattoofest returns

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and festival founders and organizers Tony and Adrienne Carey. The Northern Arizona Tattoofest is June 29-July 1 at Prescott Resort & Conference Center, 1500 AZ 69. Find out more and purchase tickets at NorthernAZTattooFest.Com.] Let’s start with the basics: What exactly is a tattoo convention? Tony: It’s a gathering of tattoo artists and there’s live tattooing on-site. There are some live tattoo contests and performances, too. Ideally we’re looking to attract people who want to get tattooed, but it’s for anyone with an interest in tattoos, even if they’re just curious. One of the things we get is that someone will come who’s thought about getting a tattoo, will look at some art or actual tattoos and get inspired to get tattooed on the spot. How does the festival work? Tony: You can buy tickets online in advance, or you can just purchase them at the door. Once you’re inside the venue, you can look at people’s work and negotiate with individual tattooers. Some of them take appointments, but there are plenty of walk-ups, as well. It’s a chance to walk around and see if you vibe with any of the artists more than others. There’s a buzz to events like this and you may end up surprised by how exciting it is. There’s a

  • Moving pictures: Prescott Film Festival turns nine

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Helen Stephenson, founder and executive director of the Prescott Film Festival. The ninth annual film fest is is June 8-16. Individual tickets are $12 ($6 for students). For a full schedule of screenings, workshops, and other events plus ticket packages, visit PrescottFilmFestival.Com.] How did the Prescott Film Festival get started? It started with an idea — which is how most things start, especially creative things — which was to bring independent film to Prescott. Then I formed a nonprofit. Elisabeth Ruffner helped me with that. Doing all the business parts of this, the marketing, all of that, too, makes it a left brain/right brain endeavor. You have to figure out how to bridge that creativity, the fun, the education into something that’s still got legs as a business. You have to write grants. Fortunately, we have a handful of granters, but you can’t rely on that and you have to constantly do grant applications. You have to sell tickets, and you have to do marketing. I didn’t have Facebook until I realized the Prescott Film Festival needed to be on Facebook. How has the goal of the film festival changed from its inception through today? The original end goal was to bring filmmaking back to Arizona. Arizona has a long history in film. And,

  • Hit the streets: Chalk It Up! celebrates a decade of street art

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Susan Crutcher, longtime volunteer and event committee member of Chalk It Up!. The 10th annual street art festival is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday & Saturday, April 21 & 22, in the parking lot of National Bank of Arizona, 201 N. Montezuma St. Find out more at PrescottChalkArt.Com.] ou’ve been involved with Chalk It Up! since the beginning, correct? I’m not an original founder, but I’ve been involved since the first year. I drove by, saw it, said, ‘whoa, what’s that?’ stopped and started talking to people, and volunteered to help. … Everybody from the originally committee has dispersed. There was the group of people who started it, then, four years ago, it changed hands and became a fundraiser for the West Yavapai Guidance Clinic. How has the event changed over the past decade? I don’t know that it’s really changed all that much. The things that were originally established have remained. It’s continued to be a free community, family event. It’s still accepting of a range of ages and artistic abilities and physical abilities. One of the benchmarks has always been how inclusive this event is. You see people interacting at Chalk It Up! that you don’t typically see interact. You might see a grandfather on the ground with his grandkids and, next to

  • A Sedona Sojourn: Take another trip on the Sedona Open Studios Tour

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Mike Upp, potter and Sedona Open Studios Tour organizer. Find out more about the tour, April 27-29 at studios in Sedona, Cornville, Cottonwood, Clarkdale, and Camp Verde, at SedonaArtistsCoalition.Org and Facebook.] What’s your pitch for this year’s Sedona Open Studios Tour? The unique hook of the open studios tour is that you’re getting to interact with the artists in their workspace instead of seeing their work in a gallery or seeing it at an arts festival. This time there are 67 artists and approximately 42 physical studios for the tour, which is April 27, 28, and 29. Some of those studios have numerous people. You actually get to see what the artists’ workspaces look like and, in many spaces, there are demos of people at work. It makes it more of a learning experience, more than just a passive thing. The tour is quite sprawling, geographically. It’s safe to assume this is self-directed? Absolutely. People tend to get the brochure and say, OK, I like glass, ceramics, and photography, so I’m going to go to these studios. We do have a few people who pride themselves on going to all of them, but it’s mostly self-selective. You go to the art forms that you appreciate and collect, and you see what else is in

  • ‘Intimacy with Disappearance’: Ævium performance reflects on sexism, ageism, culture, politics, spirit, & ecology

    Mar 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Delisa Myles, who’s performing with Ævium in “Intimacy with Disappearance,” 6:30-10 p.m. with live performances 7-9 p.m., March 23 & 24 at the Natural History Institute, 126 N. Marina St., $15-$50. A free panel discussion, subtitled “Loss, Land, & Relationship,” is 2 p.m. March 25, also at the Natural History Institute.] What exactly will “Intimacy with Disappearance” look like? We’re calling it a “Durational Performance Instillation,” and it involves a melding of dance, a photography exhibition, video projection, and sound installation. It also occurs in several different spaces in the Natural History Institute, so the audience will move between different segments of the performance. So what will people see? They’ll see our experience of being on the land and creating dance within a landscape. There are a lot of dance-in-the-landscape images with the projected video and the photographs. Really, I think, they’ll see our relationships with each other. I think we can’t help but bring that to our performance. Some of our connections go back 25 years. There’s a lot wrapped up in the theme, disappearances. There’s the idea of different kinds of loss, different kinds of letting go. Maybe that’s an actual, physical death, or maybe it’s the kind of letting go you do as you age. There are so many different ways

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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