Posts Tagged ‘James Dungeon’

  • On the Rocks: Take a tour of the Prescott Gem & Mineral Show

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Maggi Lieber, co-chairman, life member, and newsletter writer for the Prescott Gem & Mineral Club. The club’s 15th annual Prescott Gem & Mineral Show is 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 3 & 4 & 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 5 at Prescott Valley Event Center, 3201 N. Main St. , $4-$5, children under 12 free with paid adult. Find out more at PrescottGemMineral.Org.]   What exactly is the Prescott Gem & Mineral Show and what can you tell us about the vendors? This is our 15th annual show and sale. There’ll be more than 60 vendors selling a variety of things, all lapidary-, rock-, gem-, mineral-, and jewelry-related. Some of the vendors are members of the Prescott Gem & Mineral Club, others come from Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado. We even have one coming up from Texas. They’re mostly coming from all over the Southwest. We have an approximate 80 percent return rate on vendors. It’s a good indoor show, climate control, and you don’t have to worry about the wind blowing away the wares — not that rocks wound blow away, mind you. To make sure we have quality vendors, they have to have at least 80 percent rock-/mineral-/gem-related materials.   The event seems to cater to rock hounds and jewelry people alike. What’s

  • Eye of the needle: Northern Arizona Tattoofest returns

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and festival founders and organizers Tony and Adrienne Carey. The Northern Arizona Tattoofest is June 29-July 1 at Prescott Resort & Conference Center, 1500 AZ 69. Find out more and purchase tickets at NorthernAZTattooFest.Com.] Let’s start with the basics: What exactly is a tattoo convention? Tony: It’s a gathering of tattoo artists and there’s live tattooing on-site. There are some live tattoo contests and performances, too. Ideally we’re looking to attract people who want to get tattooed, but it’s for anyone with an interest in tattoos, even if they’re just curious. One of the things we get is that someone will come who’s thought about getting a tattoo, will look at some art or actual tattoos and get inspired to get tattooed on the spot. How does the festival work? Tony: You can buy tickets online in advance, or you can just purchase them at the door. Once you’re inside the venue, you can look at people’s work and negotiate with individual tattooers. Some of them take appointments, but there are plenty of walk-ups, as well. It’s a chance to walk around and see if you vibe with any of the artists more than others. There’s a buzz to events like this and you may end up surprised by how exciting it is. There’s a

  • Moving pictures: Prescott Film Festival turns nine

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Helen Stephenson, founder and executive director of the Prescott Film Festival. The ninth annual film fest is is June 8-16. Individual tickets are $12 ($6 for students). For a full schedule of screenings, workshops, and other events plus ticket packages, visit PrescottFilmFestival.Com.] How did the Prescott Film Festival get started? It started with an idea — which is how most things start, especially creative things — which was to bring independent film to Prescott. Then I formed a nonprofit. Elisabeth Ruffner helped me with that. Doing all the business parts of this, the marketing, all of that, too, makes it a left brain/right brain endeavor. You have to figure out how to bridge that creativity, the fun, the education into something that’s still got legs as a business. You have to write grants. Fortunately, we have a handful of granters, but you can’t rely on that and you have to constantly do grant applications. You have to sell tickets, and you have to do marketing. I didn’t have Facebook until I realized the Prescott Film Festival needed to be on Facebook. How has the goal of the film festival changed from its inception through today? The original end goal was to bring filmmaking back to Arizona. Arizona has a long history in film. And,

  • Hit the streets: Chalk It Up! celebrates a decade of street art

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Susan Crutcher, longtime volunteer and event committee member of Chalk It Up!. The 10th annual street art festival is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday & Saturday, April 21 & 22, in the parking lot of National Bank of Arizona, 201 N. Montezuma St. Find out more at PrescottChalkArt.Com.] ou’ve been involved with Chalk It Up! since the beginning, correct? I’m not an original founder, but I’ve been involved since the first year. I drove by, saw it, said, ‘whoa, what’s that?’ stopped and started talking to people, and volunteered to help. … Everybody from the originally committee has dispersed. There was the group of people who started it, then, four years ago, it changed hands and became a fundraiser for the West Yavapai Guidance Clinic. How has the event changed over the past decade? I don’t know that it’s really changed all that much. The things that were originally established have remained. It’s continued to be a free community, family event. It’s still accepting of a range of ages and artistic abilities and physical abilities. One of the benchmarks has always been how inclusive this event is. You see people interacting at Chalk It Up! that you don’t typically see interact. You might see a grandfather on the ground with his grandkids and, next to

  • A Sedona Sojourn: Take another trip on the Sedona Open Studios Tour

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Mike Upp, potter and Sedona Open Studios Tour organizer. Find out more about the tour, April 27-29 at studios in Sedona, Cornville, Cottonwood, Clarkdale, and Camp Verde, at SedonaArtistsCoalition.Org and Facebook.] What’s your pitch for this year’s Sedona Open Studios Tour? The unique hook of the open studios tour is that you’re getting to interact with the artists in their workspace instead of seeing their work in a gallery or seeing it at an arts festival. This time there are 67 artists and approximately 42 physical studios for the tour, which is April 27, 28, and 29. Some of those studios have numerous people. You actually get to see what the artists’ workspaces look like and, in many spaces, there are demos of people at work. It makes it more of a learning experience, more than just a passive thing. The tour is quite sprawling, geographically. It’s safe to assume this is self-directed? Absolutely. People tend to get the brochure and say, OK, I like glass, ceramics, and photography, so I’m going to go to these studios. We do have a few people who pride themselves on going to all of them, but it’s mostly self-selective. You go to the art forms that you appreciate and collect, and you see what else is in

  • ‘Intimacy with Disappearance’: Ævium performance reflects on sexism, ageism, culture, politics, spirit, & ecology

    Mar 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Delisa Myles, who’s performing with Ævium in “Intimacy with Disappearance,” 6:30-10 p.m. with live performances 7-9 p.m., March 23 & 24 at the Natural History Institute, 126 N. Marina St., $15-$50. A free panel discussion, subtitled “Loss, Land, & Relationship,” is 2 p.m. March 25, also at the Natural History Institute.] What exactly will “Intimacy with Disappearance” look like? We’re calling it a “Durational Performance Instillation,” and it involves a melding of dance, a photography exhibition, video projection, and sound installation. It also occurs in several different spaces in the Natural History Institute, so the audience will move between different segments of the performance. So what will people see? They’ll see our experience of being on the land and creating dance within a landscape. There are a lot of dance-in-the-landscape images with the projected video and the photographs. Really, I think, they’ll see our relationships with each other. I think we can’t help but bring that to our performance. Some of our connections go back 25 years. There’s a lot wrapped up in the theme, disappearances. There’s the idea of different kinds of loss, different kinds of letting go. Maybe that’s an actual, physical death, or maybe it’s the kind of letting go you do as you age. There are so many different ways

  • Oddly Enough: Russ Miller reflects on his own strange-but-true tale

    Feb 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, Feature, Russ Miller's Oddly EnoughNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Russ Miller, Prescott-based illustrator, polymath, and creator of “Oddly Enough,” which runs in, among other places, the publication you’re reading right now.] How did you get started doing “Oddly Enough”? Probably one of the big reasons why I started “Oddly Enough” was because of a library. It was the one here, actually, in the Carnegie building. It was in the late ’50s or early ’60s. I used to get dropped off in the summer there because, well, I’m sure my folks had other stuff to do. But I was in the kids’ section at the Gurley Street corner, the bottom section of that building. At one point, as a kid, you’ve read everything of interest in there, but the upstairs was daunting. It was dark, hardwood, and quiet. I remember I started looking around up there and, man, there was some really good stuff. I remember this one particular book I kept trying to check out. It was about strange people — basically, about freaks, when you get down to it — people who’d been in horrible accidents and other stuff. At the time, librarians could say, “No, put that book back on the shelf, sonny.” So, I kept trying and one day they had someone else working there and he just stamped the

  • On the Stage: ‘The Vagina Monologues’

    Feb 2, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Heidi Hampton, director of “The Vagina Monologues,” which runs 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23 & 24 at the ERAU Davis Learning Center, 3700 Willow Creek Road, $12-$15. Buy tickets online at VMPrescott.BPT.Me. All proceeds benefit Prescott Area Shelter Services. A 4AM Productions event.] What are “The Vagina Monologues”? It’s a collection of stories that Eve Ensler put together 20 years ago. She’d interviewed these women who run the gamut: rape survivors, incest survivors, homeless women, sex workers, you name it. Originally she did a collection of 12 monologues as a one-woman show. Now, women read different scripts and each year a new monologue gets put into the rotation. … Some people think it’s just a bunch of women talking about their vaginas. Believe it or not, there’s a little bit more to it than that. Some of the pieces are monologues of particular women’s stories, and others are made up from several different women. How did you end up staging this in Prescott? I’ve been with the “Monologues” for 10 years now. This is my first year in Prescott. I moved here about a year ago to help take care of my parents, who are 91. In the past, I found out, “The Vagina Monologues” were done by Prescott College and Embry-Riddle (Aeronautical University), but

  • As you wish: Method Coffee’s community art project returns

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Joseph Burton, owner of Method Coffee, 3180 Willow Creek Road, 928-777-1067. The annual “Wish Board” participatory show runs early December through mid-January.] How long have you been posting a wish board and how did it get started? I’d say probably six years all together. Thinking back, during that time it started, I want to say something awful was going on. I remember just wanting to give people a format for people to just talk about their New Year’s resolutions in a more meaningful and significant way. We’re all kind of flippant about ideas like that now. … It was altogether an organic process. I really liked the idea of different-colored tags and how it would kind of develop its own aesthetic value as it was contributed to. You probably know how I feel about Method. It serves the community as a gathering place and a community place. I’ve always felt that way and coffee shops have historically and culturally been more than just places where people buy a cup of coffee. There’s a history there with penny universities, and I see that play out in our shop every single day. We have customers that are very, very dear friends that never knew each other until they met at Method. There are people who’ve been

  • A winter’s tale: Post-Christmas native storytelling day returns to Smoki Museum

    Dec 1, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Cindy Gresser, executive director of the Smoki Museum. The annual Storytellers at Smoki event is 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 27, at the Smoki Museum, 147 N. Arizona Ave., 928-445-1230, SmokiMuseum.Org., $6-$7, free to children 12 or under and native people.] How did Storytellers at the Smoki get started? I believe we started this about five years ago. It started pretty small. We just reached out to a few people, to folks we knew would really enjoy it. It turned out to be this wonderful thing where people came and relaxed and heard some really great stories. The kids really enjoyed it. People have folks in town for the Christmas holiday and want something to do, and this has been a hit. We’ve had to move it to a bigger venue. It’s been a great reason to sit around the fireplace. How did it come into being as an event, though? We were looking for another children’s activity, something that would engage kids and also have learning involved in it. One of our volunteers came up with the idea of string games. I remembered playing them when I was a kid. My mom used to crochet and knit, so there was always string around. So I brought in a loop of string and started

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