Posts Tagged ‘James Dungeon’

  • Chalk It Up!: Hit the streets with Prescott’s premiere chalk art festival

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    What: Annual chalk street art festival When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday & Saturday, April 22 & 23 Who: All ages & skill levels Where: Parking lot of National Bank of Arizona, 201 N. Montezuma St., Prescott Why: Art, culture, music, & more, benefits the West Yavapai Guidance Clinic Foundation Web: PrescottChalkArt.Com Worth: Free, plus premiums with donations BY THE NUMBERS Last year’s Chalk It Up! Event included … • 4,632 attendees (approx.) • 1,544 registered chalkers, namely … • 696 children • 233 youth • 615 adults • 1,250-plus boxes of chalk handed out • 1,457-plus squares colored • 11 guest and featured artists • 14 entertainers • 99 official sponsors • $12,000-plus raised for community mental health programs Source: Wes Yavapai Guidance Clinic Foundation. GUEST & FEATURED ARTISTS • Lisa Bernal Brethour, Tempe • Dana Cohn, Prescott • Jeff Daverman, Prescott • Dani Fisher & Stephane Leon/Clayote Studios, Prescott Valley • Tywla Johnson, Imperial, Calif. • Scott Mackenzie, Litchfield Park • Lea & Ian Rankin/Rather Be Chalkin’, Youngtown (featured) • Tim Ritter, Orlando, Fla. • Holly Schineller, Tempe • Jamie Tooley, Queen Creek • The Van Patten Family, Prescott (featured) • Kim Welsh, Prescott Valley • Cass Womack, Brandon, Fla. • Willie Zin, Long Beach, Calif. By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Meredith Brown, development assistant at West Yavapai

  • Seeing 2.0: A matter of perspective Neil Orlowski’s storied art career yields insight in sight

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Neil Orlowski. Check this story online at 5ensesMag.Com for an update about Orlowski’s forthcoming website. He also plays keyboard in Funk Frequency, who plays regularly around Prescott.] How did you end up in Prescott? I cam here for recovery, for treatment. It’s not something that I’ve intentionally hidden or anything, but, yeah, I came here in 2007 and have been here ever since. Originally, I’m from Leavenworth, Kansas, where I grew up. I went to school at Washington University in St. Louis, majored in illustration and got a BFA. Then I moved back to Kansas City and lived there until 2000, when I moved to Tucson, where my parents lived. I was there until 2007, when I moved to Prescott. How far back does art go in your life? I was drawing ever since I was a little kid. I’d draw anything, really. I remember when I was little, my mom would suggest I draw a bird or something like that. I used to draw on the church bulletins every Sunday. I was an incredibly shy little kid, so art and drawing was something I could do on my own. I got recognized for art at a pretty early age. I won tickets to a show in Kansas City for a drawing I did

  • Fair’s fair: Prescott Regional SciTech Fest returns

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Judy Paris, president of the Children’s Museum Alliance and original organizer of the Prescott Regional SciTech Fest and Dr. Jeremy Babendure, executive director of Arizona SciTech Fest. The fourth annual Prescott Regional SciTech Fest is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Prescott Gateway Mall, 3280 Gateway Blvd.] ***** How did you get the Prescott Regional SciTech Festival started? Paris: Well, between 2004 and 2007, I’d organized a group of people, all volunteers to start a STEM-based museum for kids of all ages in Prescott. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. So, we had our own children’s science museum. We truly wanted to blend all of the sciences with the arts, so we added an art focus. They went smashingly together. As part of developing the museum — which, unfortunately, closed last June— I met Jeremy and went to a couple of informational sessions he had regarding SciTech fests. Flagstaff has had one for years. I visited that and that’s when I really decided we needed to make the jump for Prescott. STEM-based jobs aren’t only the future of our community but of the globe. I just wanted to show what Prescott actually has, as there are a lot of science-focused hidden treasures here. So much that’s going on locally in

  • Taking STEPS: Children have brush with art at the ‘Tis Annex, show at gallery

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and STEPS program art educator and artist Sue Lutz and ‘Tis maven Patti Ortiz. The STEPS Art Education Program for Children exhibit is Jan. 2-14 in the mezzanine gallery at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223. The artists reception is 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 7.] This is supposed to start with me asking you what the STEPS program is. Why don’t you share one of the projects first and we’ll dovetail into that? Lutz: One of the things each student did in this class was a self-portrait that they cut out and put together to make a mural. That class was a mix of painting and drawing with a twist of history, for example famous artists. I also introduced them to different media. There’s some water color, crayons, pastels, paint, and marker. Even the little kids can do all of that. I also introduced them to famous buildings around the world, so they got architecture, too. Ortiz: You have to tell him about your song! Lutz: Well, there are five basic elements of art that I teach them and it has this song. … [Editor’s Note: A song and dance go here. Ask Lutz; it’s quite a show.] The little ones really love that. Anyway, it gets them moving and teaches

  • Art for the arts: Arts Prescott Gallery raises funds for Skyview School arts

    Dec 2, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Anne Legge, of Arts Prescott Gallery; Breanna Rogers, Skyview School dance and performing arts teacher; and Lisa Hendrickson, Skyview School visual art teacher. The Skyview School fundraiser show is Nov. 25-Dec. 21 at Arts Prescott Gallery, 134 S. Montezuma St., 928-776-7717.] Could you give us an overview of the show and fundraiser? Legge: Every year, Arts Prescott does a fundraiser for a community-based charity, in other words, a charity based in the Tri-City area. We’ll have donated artwork on the guest wall for the entire month, donated by every member of the co-op as well as other community artists. The charity, itself, solicits work, so there’s an especially wide variety of art. This year, we chose Skyview School’s art and dance program. 100 percent of sales go to them. Sometimes, for fundraisers like this, it’s open to a very small group of people who actually see the items donated. One of the nice things about this is that it opens it up to the public. It’s to be featured on our guest wall for Fourth Friday, which is Nov. 25. There are gift cards, prints, and original pieces. They range from $5 to $500. There are art cards of students in dance, as well as art cards of students’ art. The show includes art

  • Encore, encore: Winter show highlights recent artists of The Raven Café

    Nov 4, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Maria Lynam, one of the art directors behind “Encore,” which is Nov. 19-Jan. 8 at The Raven Café, 142 N. Cortez St., 928-717-0009.] How did “Encore” come to be? Betsy Dally, my business partner and the other art director at The Raven, and I decided on it early in the year when we were setting up the calendar. We wanted a group show around the holidays that featured all of the artists who’ve had shows at the Raven since we both started about a year and a half ago. … They’re all excellent artists, and there’s a variety of media such as mixed media, oil painting, photography, and 3D art. It’s an exciting show. One of the nice things about The Raven is that they’re kind enough to let local artists hand their work in their gallery. We have very few public spaces for art, and this is an important venue. Bringing back the people who’ve already participated with us seemed like a no-brainer. Also, always thinking about what patrons of The Raven want to see, it makes sense to bring these people back. We’ve had a lot of sales from these artists, and they provide a lot of variety. Hanging a show with such diverse pieces must be quite the challenge. It is

  • Old haunts: Celebrate a Week of the Dead with Ghost Talk & much more

    Sep 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Karen Murphy, director and playwright of Prescott Ghost Talk. See schedule for event details.] What exactly is Ghost Talk? Ghost Talk is basically the reenactment of historic ghostly folklore. A lot of them are based on true stories; some of them are based on legends; and others are based on urban legends. About 80 percent of it’s covered in newspapers or historically factual in some way. Each vignette is different. One might be done like a musical, one might include movement or dance, and there’s some traditional storytelling like a Shakespearian play or melodrama or cowboy poetry. We want to stress that we have a new and different show every year. There are people who like to come every year, so we try new approaches to old stories and add brand new ones, as well. What’s the history of the event in Prescott? This is our ninth year. Ghost Talk originally started as Ghost Walk at Sharlot Hall Museum but was still a fundraiser for West Yavapai Guidance Clinic. You walked to different houses on the museum grounds and saw the performances that way. Groups of people were lead around and heard ghosts tell their stories at bushes or buildings. So, anyway, nine years ago Sharlot Hall couldn’t be the venue any more, and

  • As the twig is bent … : Highlands Nature Festival returns to Prescott

    Aug 26, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Mara Kack, education director at the Highlands Center for Natural History, which is hosting the second annual Highlands Nature Festival, Friday through Sunday, Sept. 2-4, find out more at HighlandsCenter.Org/events/highlands-nature-festival and register at HNF16.EventBrite.Com or 928-776-9550.] So, what is the Highlands Nature Festival? This is the second year. It’s a collaboration with nature-focused groups and organizations around town including Prescott Creeks, Native Plant Society, Prescott Audubon, the Sierra Club, Ecosa, and quite a few others. The goal is to get the community more ware of our local natural history and to celebrate the diversity of the Central Arizona Highlands — and emphasize how unique and beautiful our area is. … We’ve been attempting to develop the event to meet a wide audience range. The first year was definitely for adults who had some sense of the area already. This year we’ve planned several field trips for newer folks. There’s one trip to Watson Lake with Chris Hosking, of the City of Prescott, and Joe Trudeau, an ecological consultant, which will focus on local history. That would be a really wonderful trip for someone new to the area. There’s also a Prescott Creeks-lead field trip along the Greenway Trail that’s more focused on the urban water history of Prescott and natural history within an urban

  • A new look at ‘A New Look’: Students inspired by Dana Cohn showcased at The Raven Café

    Aug 26, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Emma Fenton and Billy Rose, all of whom are showing pieces at “A New Look: Art Under the Auspices of Dana Cohn,” which runs Sept. 12-Oct. 16 at The Raven Café, 142 N. Cortez St., 928-717-0009. The opening reception is 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14.] Before we get to some of the artists featured in the show, Betsy Dally and Maria Lynam, the art directors of The Raven Café, wanted to explain the idea behind it. “So many of our friends and acquaintances have started their careers at the local colleges,” Lynam said. “Both Yavapai College and Prescott College are fortunate in having inspired instructors. Dana Cohn teaches painting at both institutions and we thought it would be a good introduction to the community to show them what can be achieved.” “Once we decided [on the show] … we selected work that includes oils,acrylic, watercolor and pastel,” Dally added. “It is from students who are in their teens to those whose interest in art blossomed in retirement.” ***** What was your art background before taking a class with Dana Cohn and what were your early impressions? Fenton: I’d only taken one art class before, and that was “Drawing 1” at Yavapai College, so painting was completely new. I’d kind of dabbled in painting on

  • It’s a drag (show): Phoenix-based drag troupe returns to Prescott

    Aug 5, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Coco St. James, a drag queen and performer. See her at 4 A.M. Production’s “Drag Time” show 7 p.m. & 9 p.m. Friday & Saturday, August 26 & 27, at Stage Too, North Cortez Street alley between Willis and Sheldon streets, $15 online, $20 door. Find out more at DragTime.BPT.Me.] For someone who’s never been to a drag show before, what can you expect beyond the obvious — you know, drag queens? It’s just a good time. We’re there to entertain you. We want you to leave with a smile and to say you had a good time. … You know, it’s drag, so anything can happen. Honestly, it depends on who the host is. Some of them cuss a lot, and of those some of them apologize for it and some of them don’t. Every show is different, but it’s always a lot of fun. What are some common misconceptions about drag? A lot of people think that this is what we do all the time. They see us, and they think of us as men who want to become women, but that’s not what it is. We’re here for entertainment value, to make fun of ourselves and make fun of you. A lot of people also think it’s super serious, which it’s

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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