Get Involved: Professional Writers of Prescott and Prescott Creeks

Jan 30, 17 • 5enses, Get InvolvedNo Comments

pwp-logo-small_250Professional Writers of Prescott

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m Katherine Caccavale and I’m the vice president of programming and public relations for the Professional Writers of Prescott, which has been around since 1978. We’re a community-oriented group of writers of various levels and skills. We gather for monthly meetings, and the group sponsors three or four professional weekend workshops each year that our members are entitled to attend. Typically that’s the biggest expense of the club — bringing in professionals to help with our craft. … We have many published writers, some nationally known, and we’ve also got people who still have their work in-progress on their desks. We all work together and have a couple of networking meetings per year. I was new to the group about four years ago and people took me under their wing and shared the ups and downs of their writing. It’s really nice to involved with people at various levels. We’ve got people who’re fairly well known as a lot of people who are really talented. Some of our writers work with publishers and some are self-published. … Our members write pretty much everything. There are a lot of fiction writers, and we’ve got poets, freelance writers, creative-nonfiction writers, grant writers who are looking to expand their repertoire, and some children and young-adult writers, too. A lot of our members are retired although we’ve go a few members in their 20s.

How can we get involved?

Our monthly meetings are 6 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Prescott Public Library. People should feel free to come try it out and see if it’s a good fit for them. Membership costs $20 a year and entitles people to our professional workshops and posting on our Facebook page. We just want the word to get out about us. We’ve been in existence since 1978 and have a board of eight members, all volunteer, and just try to keep going. Usually the regular talks and workshops really focus on topics that reflect our members interest. In our last meeting (of 2016), we discussed the small press publishing landscape with a local author who graduated from Prescott College who’s had work in the Utne Reader and Southwestern American Literature. Her novel was published by Harvard Square Editions. We’ve had other ones about how to research a local area, we’ve got an open mic for poetry, and we’ve got ones lined up for book covers, character development, and going from images to imagery. The workshops, themselves, are more focused on things like plot, characters, or point of view. The groups membership is roughly 110, but meetings are about 30, on average, up to about 50. We just started posting meetings on YouTube, too, for people who can’t get out to our meetings in person. … The main thing is for us just to get the word out about the Professional Writers of Prescott.

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Find out more at PrescottWriters.Com or via Facebook.

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newpclogo_medium_Prescott Creeks

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m Peter Pierson, development and communications manager of Prescott Creeks which is in its 26th year. Our mission is to achieve healthy watersheds and clean waters in central Arizona for the for the benefit of people and wildlife through protection, restoration, education, and advocacy. Traditionally we work on surface water quality in the Granite Creek watershed as well as stream and riparian area restoration, as well as managing one-off flows through a number of green infrastructure projects throughout the city. Part of Prescott Creeks roots go back to the original Watson Woods restoration about 25 yeas ago, which originated as a project through a number of Prescott College students. The area of Watson Woods was, at one time, the town dump and site of light industry. … In the last five or six years, especially, we’ve recreated the more natural, meandering stream flow of Granite Creek. That helps slow run off and filter out contaminants like e. coli and phosphorous nitrogen before it ends up in the Watson Lake reservoir. … The two primary green infrastructure projects in the city are an area at the Adult Community Center on Rosser and an area at the intersection of Whipple and Miller Valley roads, by Taco Bell, which we fondly refer to as Taco Basin.

How can we get involved?

We always welcome new memberships and donations. We receive some mitigation fees and grant money on larger projects, but most of our outreach and education and advocacy work is supported solely through private donations and memberships. We have an ongoing public CREW team, which stands for Conservation Restoration Education for our Watershed, which occur on the first and third Thursdays of the month. During the wintertime, most of our work is focused on Watson Woods and some of the other green infrastructure sites, especially managing invasive species, which is an ongoing task. We also have ongoing water monitoring, which we do the training for. Our big event is in April — the Granite Creek cleanup on April 22 — which draws over 500 people every year. Our original focus was picking up trash in the creak, but this year we’ve really expanded it as an outreach to the community about all of the natural and wild spaces in and around Prescott. … We’ve got about 80 to 100 active members, and memberships range from $35 on up to $500. For the layperson, riparian areas are those green belts of vegetation surrounding waterways. At one point, between 12 and 15 percent of the Arizona landscape was riparian areas. Right now, it’s less than one percent of Arizona’s landscape. A lot of that change has happened in the last 50 years because of increased development and water consumption. … They’re important for over 90 percent of the wildlife and bird and insect species, to say nothing of water quality or even property value.

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Find out more at PrescottCreeks.Org or via Facebook.

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In these features, 5enses highlights individuals and organizations in the community that are making a difference. They were inspired by Alert Reader Aarti Pani and community leaders Sadira DeMarino and John Duncan. Thank you, Aarti, Sadira, and John.

Want to nominate a do-gooder or a doing-gooder group? Email tips to 5ensesMag@Gmail.Com with “Do Good” in the subject line. Don’t like who we feature? Do some good deeds or start your own group and tell us about it. Remember, our community is whatever we make it.

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