Archive for the ‘What’s up?’ Category

  • What’s Up?: Planets

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, What's up?No CommentsRead More »

    By Adam England The Northern Arizona night skies of late spring/early summer 2018 are dominated by planets. Some of the easiest objects to spot because of their relative proximity to Earth and the Sun, planets are often only outshone by our Moon. Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn will all be visible throughout the month, each characterized by its unique features. • Venus: This planet likes to hang around the horizons shortly after sunset and/or before sunrise. It’s usually a bright yellowish color due to its dense “Runaway Greenhouse Effect” atmosphere. With a decent telescope or good binoculars, you may see it as a crescent — similar to a quarter Moon. • Mars: Red in color from its oxidized soils and thin atmosphere, this planet rises later in the evening this month and shines until dawn. • Jupiter: The “King of the Planets” always puts on a good show, with the four Galilean moons — Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Calisto — dancing around in space. Sketch what you see on consecutive nights and you’ll notice the moon’s bouncing around as they orbit this gas giant. You might even be able to see the cloud bands wrapping around the planet with storms that could swallow Earth whole. • Saturn: When you first spot this planet, it may look ovular, but as you adjust your focus you’ll see the massive rings extending outward

  • What’s Up?: The Orion Nebula

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, What's up?No CommentsRead More »

    By Adam England One of the most widely recognized constellations in the world is Orion. Ancient cultures from around the world identified this grouping of stars as a giant, shepherd, archer, reaper, and even a deer, pronghorn, or buffalo. Nowadays, it’s most commonly known as “The Hunter,” and is identifiable by some of the brightest stars in the night sky making up his right shoulder (Betelgeuse), left foot (Rigel), and northern end of his thee star belt (Bellatrix). Just below his belt is a tight cluster of stars known as the Trapezium, first observed by Galileo Galilei on Feb. 4, 1617. When the Trapezium is viewed through even the smallest telescopes or binoculars, one can see what is probably the most photographed and studied object in the night sky, the Orion Nebula. M42: The Orion Nebula Magnitude: +4.0 Right Ascension: 5 hr 35 min Declination: -05 Deg., 23’ ***** Visit Prescott Astronomy Club at PrescottAstronomyClub.Org. Contact them at Contact@PrescottAstronomyClub.Org. Adam England is the director-at large and in charge of public relations for the Prescott Astronomy Club

  • What’s Up?: The Pleiades

    Mar 30, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, What's up?No CommentsRead More »

    By Adam England This month we can see one of the most easily recognizable groupings of stars in the winter sky – The Pleiades. Also cataloged as Messier 45 (M45) or colloquially as The Seven Sisters, it is a star cluster of hot blue stars averaging 444 light years from earth. Used by the Ancient Greeks to determine the Mediterranean sailing season, the name is derived from the mythology of Pleione whose seven daughters were saved from the pursuit of Orion when Zeus first transformed them into doves, and then into stars in the heavens. Nebulosity around the stars is visible with a basic telescope or good binoculars on a clear night. M45: The Pleiades Magnitude: 1.5 Size: 120 arc-min Right Ascension: 10 hr 20 min Declination: +19 deg., 51’ ***** Visit Prescott Astronomy Club at PrescottAstronomyClub.Org. Contact them at Contact@PrescottAstronomyClub.Org. Adam England is the director-at-large and in charge of public relations for the Prescott Astronomy Club

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