Archive for the ‘Feature’ Category

  • On the Rocks: Take a tour of the Prescott Gem & Mineral Show

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Maggi Lieber, co-chairman, life member, and newsletter writer for the Prescott Gem & Mineral Club. The club’s 15th annual Prescott Gem & Mineral Show is 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 3 & 4 & 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 5 at Prescott Valley Event Center, 3201 N. Main St. , $4-$5, children under 12 free with paid adult. Find out more at PrescottGemMineral.Org.]   What exactly is the Prescott Gem & Mineral Show and what can you tell us about the vendors? This is our 15th annual show and sale. There’ll be more than 60 vendors selling a variety of things, all lapidary-, rock-, gem-, mineral-, and jewelry-related. Some of the vendors are members of the Prescott Gem & Mineral Club, others come from Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado. We even have one coming up from Texas. They’re mostly coming from all over the Southwest. We have an approximate 80 percent return rate on vendors. It’s a good indoor show, climate control, and you don’t have to worry about the wind blowing away the wares — not that rocks wound blow away, mind you. To make sure we have quality vendors, they have to have at least 80 percent rock-/mineral-/gem-related materials.   The event seems to cater to rock hounds and jewelry people alike. What’s

  • Antelope Canyon Shootout: Just another ‘bucket list’ place to shoot a selfie?

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Dale O’Dell Earlier this year, I found myself guiding a group of photographers to some of the more obscure photographic locations in Arizona. They wanted to photograph the well-known sites, too, including Antelope Canyon. It had been years since I’d been to Antelope Canyon — so long ago that I’d photographed it on film — so I joined the guys for an Antelope Canyon photography tour. I’m glad I did, and I wish I hadn’t. Compared to my previous visits to Antelope Canyon, this time it was uniquely unpleasant. Popularity isn’t always a good thing. Even if you’re not familiar with the name Antelope Canyon, you’ll recognize the photos. The images of the undulating sandstone walls and light beams of the slot canyons near Lake Powell have become iconic. Pre-2000, few people had ever heard of the place, which was also known as “the slot canyon” or “the corkscrew.” Post-2000, it seemed as if everyone in the world knew about Antelope Canyon and had to go there. In a very short amount of time, photographs of Antelope Canyon transitioned from rare and beautiful to commonplace — beauty gone banal. My own discovery of Antelope Canyon was via photographs in a book by photographer Bruce Barnbaum. His 1986 book featured a chapter of photos from an unnamed slot canyon. Although Barnbaum didn’t discover Antelope Canyon and didn’t disclose its location, he

  • Show & Tell: Natalie Krol at Sean Goté Gallery

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood Absorbing, boisterous, captivating, divine, ecstatic, fecund, grandiose, halcyon, illustrious, jovial, kinetic, lustrous, masterful, nourishing, optimistic, passionate, quenchless, redolent, sensuous, transcendent, unyielding, votive, winsome, exultant, youthful, zestful. Natalie Krol’s sculptures. At Sean Goté Gallery. All July.   ***** Natalie Krol’s sculptures will be on display all July at Sean Goté Gallery, 702 W. Gurley St., 928-445-2233. Find out more at NatalieKrol.Com and SeanGote.Com. Robert Blood is a Mayer-ish-based freelance writer and ne’er-do-well who’s working on his last book, which, incidentally, will be his first. Contact him at BloodyBobby5@Gmail.Com.    

  • (It’s) For the Birds: Central Arizona Land Trust campaigns for Coldwater Farm

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Jeanne Trupiano, Coldwater Farm project manager with Central Arizona Land Trust. Find out more at CentralAZLandTrust.Org.] So what is Coldwater Farm and how did it get involved with the Central Arizona Land Trust? It’s 20 acres of land along the Agua Fria River in Dewey-Humboldt owned by Garry and Denise Rogers. They approached the Central Arizona Land Trust in 2017 with the desire to permanently protect their acreage, which spans the river there. The property contains a major Cottonwood-Willow gallery forest and perennial water, so it’s very lush, like an oasis, with very dense vegetation. They also have two large ponds that waterfowl like to use. Also in 2017, the Arizona Game and Fish Department observed two threatened or endangered bird species nesting and breeding there: the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher and the Yellow-billed Cuckoo. This is private property, though. Why does it need protection? The property has zoning that would allow for one unit for every two acres. So, whoever has the land, down the line, could develop it to that density. Eventually everything sells, and this is a way for property owners to protect sensitive areas. … Typically, it’s the landowners who approach us about this. We do some outreach and education, but typically it’s such a big decision that landowners think it

  • K-I-S-S-I-N-G

    Jun 29, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney From the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, USPTO.Gov/terms-use-uspto-websites: Patent Information Patents are published as part of the terms of granting the patent to the inventor. Subject to limited exceptions reflected in 37 CFR 1.71(d) & (e) and 1.84(s), the text and drawings of a patent are typically not subject to copyright restrictions. The inventors’ rights to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States or importing the invention into the United States for a limited time is not compromised by the publication of the description of the invention. In other words, the fact that a patent’s description may have been published without copyright restrictions does not give you permission to manufacture or use the invention without permission from the inventor during the active life of the patent. See MPEP § 600 – 608.01(v) regarding the right to include a copyright or mask work notice in patents. ***** Markoff Chaney is an Earth-based whodunit pundit and (Fnord) Discordian Pope. He has lotsa bills and no sense. Contact him at NoisyNoiseIsNoisome@Gmail.Com

  • Acting child-ish

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney From the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, USPTO.Gov/terms-use-uspto-websites: Patent Information Patents are published as part of the terms of granting the patent to the inventor. Subject to limited exceptions reflected in 37 CFR 1.71(d) & (e) and 1.84(s), the text and drawings of a patent are typically not subject to copyright restrictions. The inventors’ rights to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States or importing the invention into the United States for a limited time is not compromised by the publication of the description of the invention. In other words, the fact that a patent’s description may have been published without copyright restrictions does not give you permission to manufacture or use the invention without permission from the inventor during the active life of the patent. See MPEP § 600 – 608.01(v) regarding the right to include a copyright or mask work notice in patents. ***** Markoff Chaney is an Earth-based whodunit pundit and (Fnord) Discordian Pope. He has lotsa bills and no sense. Contact him at NoisyNoiseIsNoisome@Gmail.Com

  • Fringe benefits: That’s not a REAL Bigfoot

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Dale O’Dell If you read Alan Dean Foster’s article in last month’s 5enses, “Your Science Conspiracies may be Charged at a Higher Rate,” you got a taste of the ridiculous things conspiracy theorists believe, like how the Rothschild family “controls the weather.” Taking the path of least mental effort, it’s easier to believe a rich family controls the weather than it is to learn some weather science. Mr. Foster’s article presented a long list of conspiracy theories credited to the Rothschilds including Bigfoot. Ah ha! Bigfoot — now that’s a conspiracy theory I know something about! I absolutely assure you there are people all over the world who believe there’s a real Bigfoot creature out there. These people are true believers and they will NOT be dissuaded, facts be damned. There was the guy who brought me a picture of Bigfoot for photo analysis. He was so biased and absolutely positive he’d found a “real” photo of Bigfoot that when I didn’t confirm his bias he got angry and called me a liar. He could not accept he was wrong, so I had to be. He stormed off before I could tell him how I knew the photo was fake: It was my photo! He had a stolen copy of one my Bigfoot photos. This isn’t the first time I’ve run into caption confirmation bias. So many true believers

  • The Write Way: McCoy teaches penmanship, old-school values

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and McCoy, artist and penmanship teacher. Find out more at McCoysWriteWay.Com.] Why teach handwriting? Well, the Constitution’s in cursive, which is a pretty good reason in and of itself. That’s finally being brought back into the classroom after 30 years of non-teaching. I actually went into the schools here and offered to come in and teach handwriting for free. I didn’t want a buck for it. But they didn’t want me. From what I’ve seen and heard, they don’t even teach cursive in the schools anymore — certainly not how they used to. When you look at the laws of this country, it’s not supposed to look like Greek. These are the rules we live by, the rules our country was founded under. You’re an artist, but surely you learned penmanship earlier than that? I did, in a Catholic school. I was taught by nuns. Legibility. You had to make the letters right. It was the only thing I was very good at in school. I got C-s or whatever in everything else. But the highest compliment anyone every paid me was that I wrote like my mom. I really liked that. I mean, I looked up to her, the way she wrote and would flourish her writing. … I’ve always considered it a compliment

  • Eye of the needle: Northern Arizona Tattoofest returns

    Jun 1, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and festival founders and organizers Tony and Adrienne Carey. The Northern Arizona Tattoofest is June 29-July 1 at Prescott Resort & Conference Center, 1500 AZ 69. Find out more and purchase tickets at NorthernAZTattooFest.Com.] Let’s start with the basics: What exactly is a tattoo convention? Tony: It’s a gathering of tattoo artists and there’s live tattooing on-site. There are some live tattoo contests and performances, too. Ideally we’re looking to attract people who want to get tattooed, but it’s for anyone with an interest in tattoos, even if they’re just curious. One of the things we get is that someone will come who’s thought about getting a tattoo, will look at some art or actual tattoos and get inspired to get tattooed on the spot. How does the festival work? Tony: You can buy tickets online in advance, or you can just purchase them at the door. Once you’re inside the venue, you can look at people’s work and negotiate with individual tattooers. Some of them take appointments, but there are plenty of walk-ups, as well. It’s a chance to walk around and see if you vibe with any of the artists more than others. There’s a buzz to events like this and you may end up surprised by how exciting it is. There’s a

  • Moving pictures: Prescott Film Festival turns nine

    May 4, 18 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Helen Stephenson, founder and executive director of the Prescott Film Festival. The ninth annual film fest is is June 8-16. Individual tickets are $12 ($6 for students). For a full schedule of screenings, workshops, and other events plus ticket packages, visit PrescottFilmFestival.Com.] How did the Prescott Film Festival get started? It started with an idea — which is how most things start, especially creative things — which was to bring independent film to Prescott. Then I formed a nonprofit. Elisabeth Ruffner helped me with that. Doing all the business parts of this, the marketing, all of that, too, makes it a left brain/right brain endeavor. You have to figure out how to bridge that creativity, the fun, the education into something that’s still got legs as a business. You have to write grants. Fortunately, we have a handful of granters, but you can’t rely on that and you have to constantly do grant applications. You have to sell tickets, and you have to do marketing. I didn’t have Facebook until I realized the Prescott Film Festival needed to be on Facebook. How has the goal of the film festival changed from its inception through today? The original end goal was to bring filmmaking back to Arizona. Arizona has a long history in film. And,

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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