Archive for the ‘Feature’ Category

  • Chalk It Up!: Hit the streets with Prescott’s premiere chalk art festival

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    What: Annual chalk street art festival When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday & Saturday, April 22 & 23 Who: All ages & skill levels Where: Parking lot of National Bank of Arizona, 201 N. Montezuma St., Prescott Why: Art, culture, music, & more, benefits the West Yavapai Guidance Clinic Foundation Web: PrescottChalkArt.Com Worth: Free, plus premiums with donations BY THE NUMBERS Last year’s Chalk It Up! Event included … • 4,632 attendees (approx.) • 1,544 registered chalkers, namely … • 696 children • 233 youth • 615 adults • 1,250-plus boxes of chalk handed out • 1,457-plus squares colored • 11 guest and featured artists • 14 entertainers • 99 official sponsors • $12,000-plus raised for community mental health programs Source: Wes Yavapai Guidance Clinic Foundation. GUEST & FEATURED ARTISTS • Lisa Bernal Brethour, Tempe • Dana Cohn, Prescott • Jeff Daverman, Prescott • Dani Fisher & Stephane Leon/Clayote Studios, Prescott Valley • Tywla Johnson, Imperial, Calif. • Scott Mackenzie, Litchfield Park • Lea & Ian Rankin/Rather Be Chalkin’, Youngtown (featured) • Tim Ritter, Orlando, Fla. • Holly Schineller, Tempe • Jamie Tooley, Queen Creek • The Van Patten Family, Prescott (featured) • Kim Welsh, Prescott Valley • Cass Womack, Brandon, Fla. • Willie Zin, Long Beach, Calif. By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Meredith Brown, development assistant at West Yavapai

  • Choose your own adventure: Sedona Open Studios Tour offers myriad paths

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    What: Sedona Open Studios Tour When: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, April 28-30 Who: 59 artists from the Sedona Visual Artists Coalition Where: Sedona, Cornville, Cottonwood, Clarkdale, & Camp Verde Why: Art, culture, commerce, & socialization Web: SedonaArtistsCoalition.Org, Facebook Worth: Free ***** By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and artists on the Sedona Open Studios Tour as noted. Find out more about the tour, April 28-30 at studios in Sedona, Cornville, Cottonwood, Clarkdale, and Camp Verde, at SedonaArtistsCoalition.Org and via Facebook.] No. 44: Mike Upp, potter and Sedona Open Studios Tour organizer Earth & Fire Ceramic Design, 1525 S. Aspaas Road, Cornville EarthAndFireCeramicDesign.Com, MJUpp10@Gmail.Com, 503-789-4437 How about an overview of the Sedona Open Studios Tour? Basically the studio tour is an event that gives people the opportunity to go inside the private workspaces of artists who are on the tour. It’s very different than an arts festival or gallery show where you’re looking at art but typically not meeting the artist or seeing their workspace. It gives you a chance to talk to the artist about their process, about how they do their work. You also get to see demos at some of the studios. It’s much more in depth than what you see at an arts festival or at a gallery show. You talk to the artist, you talk

  • 12 steps from Prescott: Prescott is your portal to … well, anything

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney It’s 2 a.m. and you’re reading a Wikipedia entry entitled “List of people who have declined a British honour.” Wait — how’d you get here? Weren’t you looking for info about how telescopes work? And what’s Sir Alfred Hitchcock doing on a list of people who’ve rejected the title?! As someone or other once said, “everything’s connected … especially on Wikipedia.” There’s a (practically) endless source of (partially vetted, mostly true) information just a few swipes and/or clicks away. But where to begin? How about at home, right here in Prescott. Using the Wikipedia article on “Prescott, Arizona” as your starting point, you can take a tour of tangentially related art, science, history, philosophy, economics, and even the film career of Christopher Lee. Tribes, plants, & seaman 1. Yavapai-Prescott Tribe 2. Indian Reorganization Act 3. John Collier 4. John Collier Jr. 5. San Francisco Art Institute 6. Dogpatch, San Francisco 7. Dogfennel (links to Anthemis) 8. Cultivar 9. Plant Breeders 10. Genetically Modified Food Controversies 11. Greenpeace 12. Sailormongering History, slurs, & fast food economics 1. Arizona Territory 2. Gadsden Purchase 3. Franklin Pierce 4. Historical rankings of presidents of the United States 5. James Buchanan 6. Doughface 7. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. 8. Imperial presidency 9. Economic globalization 10. Cultural globalization 11. Big Mac Index 12. KFC Index Pros, prose, & political advisors 1. Red-light district

  • Seeing 2.0: A matter of perspective Neil Orlowski’s storied art career yields insight in sight

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Neil Orlowski. Check this story online at 5ensesMag.Com for an update about Orlowski’s forthcoming website. He also plays keyboard in Funk Frequency, who plays regularly around Prescott.] How did you end up in Prescott? I cam here for recovery, for treatment. It’s not something that I’ve intentionally hidden or anything, but, yeah, I came here in 2007 and have been here ever since. Originally, I’m from Leavenworth, Kansas, where I grew up. I went to school at Washington University in St. Louis, majored in illustration and got a BFA. Then I moved back to Kansas City and lived there until 2000, when I moved to Tucson, where my parents lived. I was there until 2007, when I moved to Prescott. How far back does art go in your life? I was drawing ever since I was a little kid. I’d draw anything, really. I remember when I was little, my mom would suggest I draw a bird or something like that. I used to draw on the church bulletins every Sunday. I was an incredibly shy little kid, so art and drawing was something I could do on my own. I got recognized for art at a pretty early age. I won tickets to a show in Kansas City for a drawing I did

  • Networking opportunities: Prescott PC Gamers Group take gaming to the next level, dimension

    Feb 27, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Justin Agrell, aka quadcricket, founding administrator of the Prescott PC Gamers Group. Find out more about PPCGG’s monthly LAN parties at PPCGG.Com or vis Facebook. The monthly fee is $10.] When and why did you form the Prescott PC Gamers Group? We started on Feb. 15, 2014. That’s when I started the group, which used to be hosted at Game On in Prescott, back when it was there. A little after that, we made it official. The idea is for local PC gamers to have a place to meet up and talk. It’s not just a LAN party; it’s a community. We’re active on Facebook and have forums online, too. … I moved here from Florida in 2007, and I used to help administer a LAN party there. I missed the community and there wasn’t a LAN party scene here except in Phoenix. So, if no one else is going to do it, you’ve got to do it yourself. I figured, let’s see if there’s any interest whatsoever and let’s see what happens. I started spreading the word and got a few people together. It was small, but nice, and it kept going and grew from a party to a community. Some of the members on site aren’t even in Prescott anymore; they still

  • Fair’s fair: Prescott Regional SciTech Fest returns

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Judy Paris, president of the Children’s Museum Alliance and original organizer of the Prescott Regional SciTech Fest and Dr. Jeremy Babendure, executive director of Arizona SciTech Fest. The fourth annual Prescott Regional SciTech Fest is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Prescott Gateway Mall, 3280 Gateway Blvd.] ***** How did you get the Prescott Regional SciTech Festival started? Paris: Well, between 2004 and 2007, I’d organized a group of people, all volunteers to start a STEM-based museum for kids of all ages in Prescott. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. So, we had our own children’s science museum. We truly wanted to blend all of the sciences with the arts, so we added an art focus. They went smashingly together. As part of developing the museum — which, unfortunately, closed last June— I met Jeremy and went to a couple of informational sessions he had regarding SciTech fests. Flagstaff has had one for years. I visited that and that’s when I really decided we needed to make the jump for Prescott. STEM-based jobs aren’t only the future of our community but of the globe. I just wanted to show what Prescott actually has, as there are a lot of science-focused hidden treasures here. So much that’s going on locally in

  • Canvasing the community: High Desert Artists take art to seniors

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations with Pamela Lopez-Davies and Deanna Matson, the former of whom is the High Desert Artists communications director and the latter of whom is a new member of the group. Contact the High Desert Artists via their Facebook Page, High Desert Artists Inc.] What can you tell us about the High Desert Artists? Matson: The group has been active in Chino Valley as a nonprofit for 30 years. Right now, we have artists that represent painting — oil, acrylic, water color —and artists who draw, who create fine art, and who make jewelry. The goal of the group is to continue volunteer work to teach seniors how to paint at the Chino Valley Senior Center. We also do community outreach and have small grants for local nonprofit agencies. Right now we have 23 members, and another goal is to grow that number. Over the past 30 years, that number has changed. We’re looking for photographers, people who work with computer graphics, crafters, quilters, sculptors, and, really, all the arts and crafts are welcome in the group. The dues are $24 per year, and a family can join for $40. Meetings are on Saturdays. Lopez-Davies: There’s a business portion to the meetings. Sometimes there are activities or demonstrations by local artists. We talk about upcoming activities and shows. An example

  • One for the books: The Purple Cat celebrates one year turning pages

    Jan 30, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Shari Graham, owner of The Purple Cat used books store. Their one-year anniversary celebration, replete with prizes and entertainment, is Feb. 3 and 4 at 3180 Willow Creek Road, 928-776-0116.] Can you give us a little background about yourself and the story behind The Purple Cat’s name? I had a tax accounting business in Prescott for 17 years, so this has been a nice departure for me, really, where I get to interact with people. That’s what I enjoy the most. Plus you get to hear good jokes. … The name is because, well, simply put, it makes me smile. When I was getting ready to open the shop, I had about two pages-worth of ideas for names and, honestly, they were all boring. I wanted something memorable and, when I saw the clip art of the cat we use for our logo, the name and that little guy’s face made me smile. That’s it. Looking back, a year in, what do you wish you would’ve known starting out a used book store? I wish I would’ve known more about what trends to expect, when are the slows times and busy times, things like that. Summer was a lot slower than I expected, then the fall started out slow then turned out to be

  • An open letter to Prescott

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    Over the last year or so, the Prescott City Council has considered adding fees to have a library card and to access the Prescott Public Library. Hours have been reduced – not significantly yet – but the decision to close on Sundays means an estimated 800-900 people don’t have access to the library at all. This may be the working mom who’s trying to take a class online or the student who needs the internet to complete a class project but whose family can’t afford home internet access, or someone looking for some respite by delving through the catalog of books. When Prescott City Councilmembers began suggesting that the library was not a “need,” and that if you wanted to use the library that perhaps you should pay for it, I became disappointed and distressed. So, I had 10,000 postcards printed to be delivered to City Council as they began the process of creating next year’s budget. This conversation was largely in part due to budget cuts and the city’s PSPRS (Public Safety Personnel Retirement System) liability. The city has two choices: increase revenue to pay down the debt or cut non-vital services. I feel the library is a vital city service. The concept and program are simple. Simply pick up a card, write a personal message on it, and we’ll deliver your thoughts on the Prescott Public Library to

  • Taking STEPS: Children have brush with art at the ‘Tis Annex, show at gallery

    Dec 30, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and STEPS program art educator and artist Sue Lutz and ‘Tis maven Patti Ortiz. The STEPS Art Education Program for Children exhibit is Jan. 2-14 in the mezzanine gallery at ‘Tis Art Center & Gallery, 105 S. Cortez St., 928-775-0223. The artists reception is 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 7.] This is supposed to start with me asking you what the STEPS program is. Why don’t you share one of the projects first and we’ll dovetail into that? Lutz: One of the things each student did in this class was a self-portrait that they cut out and put together to make a mural. That class was a mix of painting and drawing with a twist of history, for example famous artists. I also introduced them to different media. There’s some water color, crayons, pastels, paint, and marker. Even the little kids can do all of that. I also introduced them to famous buildings around the world, so they got architecture, too. Ortiz: You have to tell him about your song! Lutz: Well, there are five basic elements of art that I teach them and it has this song. … [Editor’s Note: A song and dance go here. Ask Lutz; it’s quite a show.] The little ones really love that. Anyway, it gets them moving and teaches

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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