Archive for the ‘5enses’ Category

  • Chance of a ghost: Week of the Dead offers variety of haunts, old & new

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By James Dungeon The “Week of the Dead” is a week of events and workshops leading up to the Day of the Dead that promote the art, culture, history, and folklore of Arizona. Each of the events benefits its respective non-profit and sponsors including the Prescott Center for the Arts, Smoki Museum, West Yavapai Guidance Center, and Yavapai Cemetery Association. “Day of the Dead” art exhibit • Oct. 2-Nov. 2: Art show featuring Día de los Muertos-themed pieces. Benefits the Prescott Center for the Arts. (PCA Gallery, 208 N. Marina St., 928-445-3286, free admission) “Ghost Feast” • Oct. 11: A dinner-theatre-inspired evening of tapas and “Ghost Talk TOO!” teasers on the El Gato Azul patio. (El Gato Azul World Bistro, 316 W. Goodwin St., 928-445-1070, $30, RSVP) Ghost Talk TOO!” • 6, 7:30, & 9 p.m. Oct. 21,22, 27 & 28: Period costumes, creepy props, mood lighting, eerie sound effects, spooky sets, special effects, and more adorns a series of vignettes in this multi-genre ode to Arizona history and folklore. Directed by Erica Muse, written by Parker Anderson. (Prescott Center for the Arts Stage TOO!, alley between Cortez and Marina streets behind PCA, 928-445-3286, $10-$13) “Historic Cemetery Walk” • 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28: Dearly departed spirits from Arizona’s past tell their stories on this hour-long guided tour through the gravesites of Yavapai County pioneers. (Citizens Cemetery, 815

  • Everybody was here: A portrait of the artist(‘s self portraits)

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Alan Dean Foster's PerceivingsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Alan Dean Foster Why selfies? I mean, I already know what I look like. That’s what mirrors, hairstylists, bad home videos, and good grandparents are for. Why go to the trouble of taking a picture of myself in front of Big Ben, or a rainforest river, or six drunken fake Spidermen in Times Square? Why not just take pictures of each place? Doesn’t inserting oneself in front of the presumably interesting locale spoil the picture? I reckon it’s because humans have always had this incorrigible desire to validate their existence; first through art, then graffiti, and today via the ubiquitous selfie. Regardless of the form it takes, the selfie declares, “I was here! I existed. I meant something — even if only for the brief time it required to paint this image, etch these words, or take this snapshot.” Selfies are an expression of the id and a desire to find permanence in an impermanent universe. Much to humanity’s surprise, like so many things over time these intensely personal expressions quite inadvertently become history and art. That’s not to say the shaky quickie pix of you and your date smooching on Whiskey Row at one on a Saturday morning will some day appear in a celebrated visual history of the 21st century — but it might. A lot depends on the lighting, what you’re wearing, your makeup, what’s visible

  • Playing it safe: Tips & tricks toward better cyber security

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Two-bit ColumnNo CommentsRead More »

    By Justin Agrell With all of the news of hackers hacking and identities being spirited away, you might feel a little uneasy about your knowledge of proper security measures. I’ve compiled a collection of advice to begin you on your quest to becoming more hacker resistant and, hopefully, allow you to sleep a little better at night. We begin with a stern look and finger-wagging toward those who are over-broadcasting their lives on social media. While this mostly applies to younger, less wary generations, it helps if you’re leery of providing personal information to websites. While stalking is certainly a scary consideration, most of us are far more likely to either have our identity stolen or our house robbed when the world knows we’re out and about eating delicious delicacies and snapping senseless selfies. There’s nothing wrong with posting every meal and adventure online — just make sure you limit who can view your content. Many websites and services use security questions as a form of authentication. These days, figuring out Fluffy’s name or what schools you’ve attended is trivial. Private investigators have never had it easier, and it’s up to you to choose those questions that don’t have easily discoverable answers. Also consider — and I’ll try not to shock you too much — that you can fib, jumble answers, or just enter gobbledegook for security questions. As long

  • News from the Wilds: October 2017

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the WildsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris October in the Mogollon Highlands is one of the great turning points of the year — the warmth and activity of summer drops into the lower deserts and valleys as the cold of the coming winter (borne by heavy, cold air) slithers down the creek beds from the uplands. The evening air carries a sliver of ice and brings smells of wood smoke and high mountains, while the days are filled with dried grasses and the last of the year’s butterflies, native bees, and flowers. The monsoon showers have finally passed, leaving a wave of activity in their wake — insects laying eggs, plants setting seed, birds migrating, and mammals preparing winter stores and putting on fat for the coming time of scarcity. In October, the second dry season of the year typically begins as the heat-driven summer monsoon pattern, which draws moist air masses north from the Gulf of California, shifts to the storm-driven winter pattern based in the Pacific Ocean, where massive storm systems catapult smaller, moist low-pressure troughs across our region, bringing snow and rain. And, during this changeover, the skies over the Mogollon Highlands tend to stay clear, though it is also during this time that the Pacific hurricane season is at its peak, and some of these hurricanes move through our region dropping sometimes large amounts of precipitation. October reliably brings our

  • Myth & Mind: Restless riders

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Myth & MindNo CommentsRead More »

    By Reva Sherrard In 1127, the chronicler of Peterborough Abbey in central England recorded an alarming event. Both monks and local townsfolk “saw and heard a great number of huntsmen hunting. The huntsmen were black, huge, and hideous, and rode on black horses and on black he-goats, and their hounds were jet black, with eyes like saucers, and horrible. … [In] the night the monks heard them sounding and winding their horns.” (From the “Peterborough Chronicle,” translator G. N. Garmonsway) Witnesses reported this frightening spectacle for weeks; it began in midwinter and only ended at Easter. This was not a mortal cavalcade. The people of Peterborough had seen the Wild Hunt. These were troubled times for England, and Peterborough Abbey was no exception. Only 10 years previously, some drunken monks had been responsible for a fire that destroyed their library; seven years later a succession crisis would plunge the country into cataclysmic civil war, and fill the chronicle’s pages with accounts of tortures inflicted on the common people. The conquest of England by William of Normandy in 1066 had violently uprooted Saxon society, traumatized the island’s patchwork of Germanic and Celtic cultures, and threatened the language with extinction. Taxes to enforce the new order came directly from those who could spare the least. Starvation was rampant. This was the age that gave rise to the legends of Robin Hood, the

  • A life & death matter: Stephen Jenkinson talks about dying wisely

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Stephen Jenkinson, teacher, author, and subject of the documentary “Griefwalker.” Jenkinson is in Prescott for three events. He’s speaking 3-4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10 at Peregrine Book Co., 219 N. Cortez St. He’ll be at a screening of “Griefwalker,” 7-9:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10 at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Davis Learning Center, 3700 Willow Creek Road, $25. He’s giving one of his signature talks, “Die Wise: Making meaning of the Ending of Days,” 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at the ERAU Davis Learning Center, 3700 Willow Creek Road, $115. Find out more and purchase tickets at OrphanWisdom.Com.] You’re known for speaking and writing about dying and death. How did you get into that? Well, I’m not employed by anybody; it’s an arbitrary call in that sense. I don’t have a job title or anything like that. The entire enterprise is self-appointed. The intention is to call into deep question the prevailing attitudes in the death trade. It’s a task I’ve given myself. What can people expect from your talks? You’re asking me about people’s expectations and that’s for them to answer, not me. The easiest way to say it is that I’m not in the customer satisfaction business. I’m not selling anything. What people’s expectations are, I couldn’t begin to guess. I could say that even if you

  • Plant(s & friends) of the Month

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Plant of the MonthNo CommentsRead More »

    Photos by Mara Trushell

  • Bird of the Month: Double-crested Cormorant

    By Russ Chappell Double-crested Cormorants are large, expert fishermen with a diet of fish supplemented with insects, crustaceans, and amphibians. They pursue underwater prey with powerful kicks of their webbed feet, and if they catch a crustacean, they strike it on the water until the legs break off, then flip it in the air, and catch it head first for easier swallowing. They have goose like bodies, long, loon-type necks, and thin, strongly curved bills, approximately the length of their heads. Adults are brown-black with yellow-orange facial skin, and the immature birds are browner with paler necks and breasts. They have aquamarine-colored eyes and bright blue inside their mouths. During breeding season, adults display double-crests of white or black scruffy feathers on their heads, thus the Double-crested Cormorant name. When not fishing, they rest on branches, rocks or the shore with their wings spread to dry, since their feathers contain less preen oil than other water fowl. This is a minor inconvenience that contributes to their underwater speed and maneuverability. Double-crested Cormorants usually reside near large bodies of water, however many form breeding colonies near small ponds and travel up to 40 miles to a quality feeding site. Listed as “uncommon transient and casual summer and winter visitors” in Professor Carl Tomoff’s “Birds of Prescott, Arizona,” they raise two broods a year with up to seven chicks per brood. A male attracts

  • Oddly Enough: October 2017

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Russ Miller's Oddly EnoughNo CommentsRead More »

    By Russell Miller Gun manufacturers have shown amazing ingenuity in the making of firearms throughout history. Concealed weapons have taken the shape of pocket watches, whip handles, smoking pipes, flashlights, belt buckles, gloves, helmets, shields, and umbrellas. There is even a surviving example of a Spanish flintlock key pistol. ODDLY ENOUGH … Possibly the weirdest, if not the most dangerous demonstration of hidden weaponry is a set of German tableware made in 1715. Talk about “shooting your mouth off.” ***** Carlisle Castle in the English county of Cumbria has been a working castle for nine hundred years. Three hundred years ago, after the fall of the Jacobite rebellion in Scotland, more than 300 Scots and Irish prisoners were brought and held here. The prisoners, tried for treason, were sent South to be hanged, drawn and quartered. Others were sold as slaves. During the summer of 1746, while awaiting trial, as many as 90 people were held in a single dungeon. In desperation for water, many prisoners were reduced to licking the moisture that collected on the vault walls in order to stay alive. ODDLY ENOUGH … These damp stones were visited so often that permanent tongue grooves were worn into them and can still be seen to this day. They are known as the “licking stones of Carlisle Castle.” ***** Russell Miller is an illustrator, cartoonist, writer, bagpiper, motorcycle enthusiast,

  • Everything under the Sun: A journey to and from the 2017 total solar eclipse

    Oct 6, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, ColumnNo CommentsRead More »

    Story, photos, & illustrations by Dale O’Dell Given that the occurrence of a total solar eclipse is about once per continent per human lifetime, it’s highly likely that during your lifetime an eclipse will happen over the landmass on which you live. And you should see it. An eclipse is a unique astronomical event that you should witness at least once, even if you must travel a great distance. There’s nothing comparable. It can’t be overemphasized: Each and every human being should see at least one total solar eclipse. I was already planning another photo shoot when I first learned about the 2017 solar eclipse. I’d be photographing land art installations featuring automobiles including “Carhenge” in Alliance, Neb. The Aug. 21 total solar eclipse would span the entirety of the North America, and I wondered whether the shadow would fall over Nebraska. Yes, it would! The Moon’s shadow would traverse the sky directly over Alliance. I scheduled the trip and planned on shooting both “Carhenge” and the eclipse. I taught myself about solar filters, protecting my eyes and my camera’s sensor, exposure data, and all of that. I read books and astronomy websites. Many experts were saying the same thing about optimum viewing locations: The highest probability of clear skies was in the middle of the continent like in, you know, Alliance, Neb. Since it looked like I’d have company,

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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