Search Results for "green heron"

  • Green Heron

    By Rich Lewis Recently, my partner and I were out birding in Watson Woods. As we walked over the red foot bridge and headed up the east side of the small pond, an ungainly bird flew in our direction from the other side of the lake. Upon noticing our presence, it veered, made a quick U-turn, and flew back from whence it came. My partner whispered, “Green Heron.” I had heard that they were around here, both at Watson and along Granite Creek where I live in the Dells, but they had always eluded me. I had only seen them down in Gilbert and in Mexico but never around Prescott, so naturally I wanted to get a closer look. Known to lurk in the tall weeds rather than out in the open like Great Blue Heron or Great Egret, this was a rare sighting. Green Heron are one of the shortest in the wading bird family, and they are quite stocky when hunched in the bushes waiting to capture their next meal. They are strikingly colored: velvety green on their backs with a dark cap and a reddish-brown chest. It is surprising how well their beautiful colors blend in with the vegetation surrounding them. One of their traits that I find most interesting is that they are one of the few birds that will actually try to lure fish to

  • If you build it … : Happy Oasis brings Heaven on Earth to Prescott

    Nov 6, 15 • ndemarino • 5enses, Feature3,198 CommentsRead More »

    By Robert Blood [Editor’s note: The following interview was culled from conversations between the reporter and Happy Oasis, owner of Heaven on Earth, a nature sanctuary in the Granite Dells. Visit HappyOasis.Com to find out more.]   Tell us about Heaven on Earth. It’s Prescott’s newest wildlife sanctuary. It’s not only a private sanctuary for wildlife, but also for the wild life inside us. The idea is to bring out and enhance our communication with nature and eco-conscious living. There are gardens with edible plants mixed in with wild flowers — all of which are friendly to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds — as well as dozens of fruit trees. Heaven on Earth is surrounded by thousands of acres of what should have been a national park. My beloved John and I feel as if we’re the caretakers — not just of our home here, but of these gorgeous Granite Dells, as well. Heaven on Earth is surrounded by a network of trails that traverse some of the most spectacular scenery in Arizona. Part of that is city of Prescott designated Open Space. The trail system behind our home is called the Granite Gardens Trails. I envisioned these trails before I suggested to the developer that he sell and donate the trail land to the city. The trails were brilliantly designed by Chris Hoskins and built by his Over the Hill

  • News From the Wilds: June 2017

    Jun 2, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the WildsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris June can be a pretty tough time in the Mogollon Highlands of central Arizona. It is reliably the driest month of the year, with nearly 2 out of 5 years receiving no precipitation at all, and most others receiving only the most minute amounts. If there is any rain, it comes at the end of the month with the first of the monsoonal storms. In fact, the drought of June is critical in bringing about the rains of July, because as the hot, dry air in the Sonoran Desert and the Interior West rises it draws the moist, humid air from the Sea of Cortez northward into our region. Whenever these wet air masses enter our area from the south they bring the possibility of rain, but without the heat that accumulates this month the rain will not fall. But it is possible to observe this large-scale, regional climatic pattern evolve by watching the movement and development of the different cloud species as they move across our skies — a pursuit known as cloudspotting. June mornings tend to dawn clear and bright, but especially toward the end of the month, cumulus clouds appear and begin to build in the hot afternoons. These clouds may start as relatively small Cumulus humulis, wider than they are tall and uniformly white, and then turn to Cumulus mediocris, as tall as

  • ‘Everything’s Hometown’: Winging it with nature in Prescott

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, Alan Dean Foster's PerceivingsNo CommentsRead More »

    The author in a Tuareg headdress. Courtesy photo. By Alan Dean Foster We’ve lived in Prescott for 36 years and I still take the local nature for granted. It’s amazing how downright blasé you can become over time about such things. It’s usually when we have visitors from out of town, often from metropolitan areas where the only real wildlife tends to hang around liquor stores, that I realize how fortunate we are, and how each of us really needs to take time from work and commuting and the damn TV and the addictive internet to get out and have a look around town for something besides the weekly arts and crafts festival. We’re doubly fortunate because our house backs onto one of the several major creeks that run through town. That gives us access not only to more wildlife but to a greater variety of visitors, as critters that tend to hang out elsewhere come down for the occasional drink. There’s the rare bobcat, and deer, and skunks. We had a bear once, a long time ago, and of course coyotes and javelinas are a steady presence. But to get a real feel for Prescott city wildlife you have to pay attention to the birds. I’m not going to turn this into a birdwatcher column. For one thing, there are better local resources available and for another, I’d probably

  • 12 steps from Prescott: Prescott is your portal to … well, anything

    Mar 31, 17 • ndemarino • 5enses, FeatureNo CommentsRead More »

    By Markoff Chaney It’s 2 a.m. and you’re reading a Wikipedia entry entitled “List of people who have declined a British honour.” Wait — how’d you get here? Weren’t you looking for info about how telescopes work? And what’s Sir Alfred Hitchcock doing on a list of people who’ve rejected the title?! As someone or other once said, “everything’s connected … especially on Wikipedia.” There’s a (practically) endless source of (partially vetted, mostly true) information just a few swipes and/or clicks away. But where to begin? How about at home, right here in Prescott. Using the Wikipedia article on “Prescott, Arizona” as your starting point, you can take a tour of tangentially related art, science, history, philosophy, economics, and even the film career of Christopher Lee. Tribes, plants, & seaman 1. Yavapai-Prescott Tribe 2. Indian Reorganization Act 3. John Collier 4. John Collier Jr. 5. San Francisco Art Institute 6. Dogpatch, San Francisco 7. Dogfennel (links to Anthemis) 8. Cultivar 9. Plant Breeders 10. Genetically Modified Food Controversies 11. Greenpeace 12. Sailormongering History, slurs, & fast food economics 1. Arizona Territory 2. Gadsden Purchase 3. Franklin Pierce 4. Historical rankings of presidents of the United States 5. James Buchanan 6. Doughface 7. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. 8. Imperial presidency 9. Economic globalization 10. Cultural globalization 11. Big Mac Index 12. KFC Index Pros, prose, & political advisors 1. Red-light district

  • New From the Wilds: June 2016

    Jun 3, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the WildsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris June can be a pretty tough time in the Mogollon Highlands of central Arizona. It’s reliably the driest month of the year, with nearly two out of five years receiving no precipitation at all, and most others receiving only the most minute amounts. If there is any rain, it comes at the end of the month with the first of the monsoonal storms. In fact, the drought of June is critical in bringing about the rains of July, because as the hot, dry air in the Sonoran Desert and the Interior West rises it draws the moist, humid air from the Sea of Cortez to our region. Whenever these wet air masses enter our area from the south they bring the possibility of rain, but without the heat that accumulates this month the rain will not fall. But it is possible to observe this large-scale, regional climatic pattern evolve by watching the movement and development of the different cloud species as they move across our skies — a pursuit known as cloudspotting. June mornings tend to dawn clear and bright, but especially toward the end of the month, cumulus clouds appear and begin to build in the hot afternoons. These clouds may start as relatively small Cumulus humulis, wider than they are tall and uniformly white, and then turn to Cumulus mediocris, as tall as they are

  • News From the Wilds: June 2015

    Jun 5, 15 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the Wilds2,668 CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris June, in most years, can be a pretty tough time in the Central Highlands. It is reliably the driest month, with nearly two out of five years receiving no precipitation at all, and most others receiving only the most minute amounts. If there is any rain, it comes at the end of the month with the first of the monsoonal storms. In fact, the drought of June is critical in bringing the rains of July, as the hot, dry air in the Sonoran Desert and the Interior West rises and draws the moist, humid air from the Sea of Cortez to our region. This regional climatic pattern is observable locally in the movement and development of different cloud species. June mornings tend to dawn clear and bright, but especially toward the end of the month, cumulus clouds appear and build in the hot afternoons. These clouds may start as relatively small Cumulus humulis, wider than they are tall, and uniformly white, and then turn to Cumulus mediocris, as tall as they are wide, and with gray bases, and eventually to towering, 30,000-foot-tall Cumulus congestus storm clouds. It is only this last species that brings with it the most precious of all resources in the high desert — water. And with those first, massive raindrops the quiescent, drought-stressed landscape begins its strident reawakening. Until that time, however, the

  • News From the Wilds: June 2014

    May 30, 14 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the Wilds20 CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris June can be a pretty tough time in the Central Highlands. It is reliably the driest month of the year, with nearly two out of five years receiving no precipitation at all, and most others receiving only the most minute amounts. If there is any rain, it comes at the end of the month with the first of the monsoonal storms. The drought of June is, in fact, critical in bringing the rains of July, as the hot, dry air in the Sonoran Desert and the Interior West rises and draws the moist, humid air from the Sea of Cortez to this region. Over the course of the month, you can observe these storms building in the Central Highlands via the appearance of different species of clouds. June mornings tend to dawn clear and bright, but, especially toward the end of the month, cumulus clouds appear and build in the hot afternoons. These clouds may start as relatively small Cumulus humulis, wider than they are tall, and uniformly white, and then turn to Cumulus mediocris, as tall as they are wide, and with gray bases, and eventually to towering, 30,000-foot-tall Cumulus congestus storm clouds. This is the moment many residents of the Central Highlands — animal, plant, fungus, and even bacteria — wait for. And when the first massive raindrops fall, the whole of our human and

Celebrating art and science in Greater Prescott.

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