Search Results for "Juniper titmouse"

  • Bird of the Month: Juniper Titmouse

    By Mark & Farrish Sharon The Juniper Titmouse is a resident Western bird that can be found from Northern Arizona east to New Mexico and western Colorado and as far north as southern Idaho. It also frequents Nevada. Prime Juniper Titmouse habitat includes Scrub Oak, Pinyon Pine, and Alligator Juniper woodland. The bird is listed as uncommon throughout its range, but seen regularly in and around Prescott. It’s a small, very plain, drab gray-brown, crested bird with no contrasting markings. Indeed, its old name was Plain Titmouse. Despite these unremarkable descriptors, the bird has a perky, small crest, a dark eye, short bill, and a decidedly cute face. And its behavior is most charming. The Juniper Titmouse is an active bird that flies from tree to tree mostly staying in the cover of the foliage. It doesn’t stay in one place for long, a characteristic that makes it hard to find with binoculars. However, in the early spring (mark your calendars for late February and early March), this bird sits atop Pinyon Pines and junipers singing its multiple songs. Northern Arizona is home to Bridled and Juniper Titmouse. The former has a more limited range that includes the mountains of southeast Arizona and New Mexico and south to Mexico. The Oak Titmouse of coastal California is so similar in appearance to the Juniper Titmouse, that it’s best identified by range

  • News From the Wilds: December 2016

    Dec 2, 16 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the WildsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris The coldest season has come round again, and the wilds have entered the depth of their quiescence. But though the nights are at their longest now — the longest of the year is on December 21, the Winter Solstice — the coldest (and, for many species, hardest) parts of the winter are still to come. December is slightly warmer and bears a bit less rain and snow than January, when the days will be already growing longer again. This lag between the darkest and the coldest times is a result of the thermal qualities of the air masses in the atmosphere which hold their temperature long after incoming solar radiation has declined, as they now begin to lose their heat to the rapidly cooling land. It is for this reason that the warmest parts of the summer are typically after the Summer Solstice and that the coldest parts of the winter are after the Winter Solstice. As a result of low temperatures and lack of sunlight, plants and insects now enter the depth of their winter diapause, when almost no activity is to be found. These two groups are the primary food sources for almost all of our species, so their somnolence brings extreme hardship for birds and mammals, the two groups that remain most active. Only the most resourceful and innovative can find food during this

  • News From the Wilds: December 2015

    Dec 4, 15 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the WildsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris The coldest season has come round again, and the Wilds have entered the depth of their quiescence. But though the nights are at their longest now — the longest of the year is on December 21, the Winter Solstice — the coldest (and, for many species, hardest) parts of the winter are still to come. December is slightly warmer and bears a bit less rain and snow than January, when the days will be already growing longer again. This lag between the darkest and the coldest times is a result of the thermal qualities of the air masses in the atmosphere, which hold their temperature long after incoming solar radiation has declined. It is for this reason that the warmest parts of the summer are typically after the Summer Solstice, and that the coldest parts of the winter are after the Winter Solstice. As a result of low temperatures and lack of sunlight, plants and insects now enter the depth of their winter diapause, when almost no activity is to be found. These two groups are the primary food sources for almost all of our species, so their somnolence brings extreme hardship for birds and mammals, the two groups that remain most active. Only the most resourceful and innovative can find food during this time, and often creatures are more desperate because of this. Predators, such as

  • News From the Wilds: December 2014

    Nov 28, 14 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the Wilds2,627 CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris The coldest season has come round again, and the wilds have entered the depth of their quiescence. But though the nights are at their longest now — the longest of the year is on Dec. 21, the Winter Solstice — the coldest and toughest parts of the winter are still to come. December is slightly warmer and bears a bit less rain and snow than January, when the days will be already growing longer again. This lag between the darkest and the coldest times is a result of the thermal qualities of the air masses in the atmosphere, which hold their temperature long after incoming solar radiation has declined. It is for this reason that the warmest parts of the summer are typically after the Summer Solstice, and that the coldest parts of the winter are after the Winter Solstice. As a result of low temperatures and lack of sunlight, plants and insects now enter the depth of their winter diapause, when almost no activity is to be found. These two groups are the primary food sources for almost all of our species, so their somnolence brings extreme hardship for birds and mammals, the two groups that remain most active. Only the most resourceful and innovative can find food during this time, and often creatures are more desperate because of this. Predators, such as Cooper’s Hawks, Sharp-shinned

  • News from the Wilds: December

    Dec 6, 13 • ndemarino • 5enses, News From the WildsNo CommentsRead More »

    By Ty Fitzmorris The coldest time has come round again, and the wilds have entered the depth of their quiescence. But though the nights are at their longest now — the year’s longest is Dec. 21, the Winter Solstice — the coldest, toughest parts of the winter are still to come. December is slightly warmer and bears less rain and snow than January, when the days will be growing longer again. This lag between the darkest and the coldest times is a result of air masses in the atmosphere that hold their temperature long after incoming solar radiation has declined. That’s why the warmest parts of the summer typically are after the Summer Solstice and that the coldest parts of the winter are after the Winter Solstice. As a result of low temperatures and lack of sunlight, plants and insects now enter the height of their winter diapause, when almost no activity is to be found. These groups are the food sources for almost all of our species, so their somnolence causes extreme hardship for birds and mammals — the two groups that remain most active. Only the resourceful and innovative can find food during this time, and creatures often prove desperate. Predators, such as Cooper’s Hawks, Sharp-shinned Hawks, Coyotes and Bobcats, become more daring in their attempts to catch small birds and rodents, and, as a result, prey species

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